History and Philosophy of Physics

   

Mass, Force, & Energy: A New Formulation

Authors: Stanley James Speck

What is energy? This question, as Richard Feynman has pointed out, has never been given a satisfactory explanation. What energy “is” - in some ultimate sense – is, strangely enough, still an open question. In this speculative venture which is both a physical and philosophical quest, we propose a definite and perhaps startling answer: Energy is not something which causes motion; it is motion itself, or rather, it is a “quantity of motion” calculated as the sum of the speeds of all the particles in the system. Mass is a quantity of motion confined or bound to a certain region of space. Force is the rate of change of a quantity of motion when an object accelerates. Any “quantity of motion” can thus be calculated as Kinetic Energy or as Mass (or as Work), depending upon the needs and circumstances of the inquiry. We give a lucid, step by step explanation of this idea, and suggest that motion is not an accidental quality, but ontologically fundamental. We call the ultimate object which is moving a ‘particle point,’ which, unlike the geometric point, is in any region of space finite in number. The energy in any finite region of space is consequently the number particle-points multiplied by their speed, or more precisely, by their speed squared. The speed of all such particles is constant and uniform: the speed of light. We lead the skeptical reader through these formulations, accounting for momentum, inertia, and entropy along the way. In the end, as many questions are raised as are answered, but it is an open road, as it should be. massforceenergy@gmail.com

Comments: 24 Pages.

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[v1] 2016-10-15 10:21:36

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