Quantum Physics

   

A Wave Pattern Appears on a Spectrum When a Paper Slit is Placed Across the Spectroscope Slit

Authors: H.S. Dhaliwal

I used a spectroscope box with a slit, a cd and a viewing hole. I placed varying sized paper slits across the spectroscope slit at varying angles, this produced a wave pattern across the spectrum. I refer to this as the spectral wave. The spectral wave across the emission lines are seen in a certain way (top to bottom) and the spectral waves across the absorption lines usually are the opposite way (bottom to top). I included pictures of when I had the paper slit parallel to the spectroscope slit (interesting results with a line in each emission line) and at 90 degrees to the spectroscope slit, which showed no spectral wave at these positions. Pictures with multiple spectral waves have more than one paper slit on the spectroscope slit with one paper slit inverted to the other. Perhaps you may think this is diffraction, but the odd thing is that the spectral wave does not appear on a continuous spectrum which may be evidence this phenomenon is not diffraction because if it was, it should also be seen on the continuous (daylight) spectrum. The following images are from a light source that creates a non-continuous spectrum.

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[v1] 2016-12-04 05:02:34

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