Condensed Matter

   

Estudo Das Propriedades Físico-Químicas e Farmacológicas da Argemone Mexicana L.

Authors: R. Gobato, D. F. G. Fedrigo, A. Gobato

Argemone Mexicana L. popularly known as: Mexican poppy, thorny Mexican poppy, thistle or cardo santo is a species of poppy found in Mexico and widespread in many parts of the world. It is an extremely resistant plant, tolerant to drought and poor soils, being often the only vegetation cover present in the soil. It has bright yellow latex, and although toxic to grazing animals, it is rarely ingested. From the family Papaveraceae, informally known as poppies, it is an important ethnopharmacological family of 44 genera and about 760 species of flowering plants. The plant is the source of several types of chemical compounds, such as flavonoids, although alkaloids are the most commonly found. In addition to pharmaceutical efficacy, certain parts of the plant also show toxic effects. It is used in different parts of the world for the treatment of various diseases including tumors, warts, skin diseases, rheumatism, inflammation, jaundice, leprosy, microbial infections, malaria, agrobacteria, among others and as a larvicide against Aedes aegypti, vector Of dengue.

Comments: 1 Page. Portuguese

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[v1] 2017-01-06 14:58:00

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