Quantum Physics

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Recent submissions

Any replacements are listed farther down

[2477] viXra:1806.0186 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-13 08:01:15

System Returned to Initial State

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Imagine a metal bar that has been heated at one end. Instead of the heat gradually spreading over its entire length, the bar eventually becomes hot again at the place where it was originally. [30] A new benchmark quantum chemical calculation of C2, Si2, and their hydrides reveals a qualitative difference in the topologies of core electron orbitals of organic molecules and their silicon analogues. [29] A University of Central Florida team has designed a nanostructured optical sensor that for the first time can efficiently detect molecular chirality—a property of molecular spatial twist that defines its biochemical properties. [28] UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. [27] A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2476] viXra:1806.0183 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-13 11:18:39

Why it is Hard to Understand – And, Therefore, Explain – Quantum Math

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle MAEc BAEc BPhil
Comments: 14 Pages.

If mathematics is the queen of science, then physics might well be the king. It successes are obvious. However, as a science, physics may have failed in one regard, and that is to explain what its basic concepts – such as state vectors, wavefunctions, and transformation matrices – actually represent. When studying quantum mechanics, it is, effectively, hard to keep up the initial enthusiasm, and those who branch out to other fields – which is most of us – quickly end up going through the motions only: we regurgitate models and equations and know how to solve the standard problems, so as to pass the exam, but then forget about them as soon as possible. This paper explores a very intuitive sentiment about the issue: the wavefunction is a rather ‘flat’ mathematical object – it is two-dimensional, basically – so it can’t do the trick, perhaps. In contrast, Maxwell’s equations have real vectors in them, which is why a deeper or more intuitive understanding of electromagnetism comes relatively easily. Indeed, when everything is said and done, we are just human beings living in three-dimensional space, and that is why vector equations (or systems of vector equations), as a mathematical tool, make sense to us. This paper further explores this sentiment. It also offers a way out by, predictably, presenting yet another possible physical interpretation of the wavefunction. More importantly (for the reviewer of this paper, at least), this paper offers a sensible response to the mainstream view that three-dimensional physical interpretations of the wavefunction cannot make any sense because of the weird 720° symmetry of the wavefunction when describing spin-1/2 particles (fermions or – for all practical purposes – electrons). The author does so by analyzing (1) Dirac’s belt trick more in detail – and what it implies in terms of the interaction between the observer and the object – as well as (2) Feynman’s derivation of the transformation matrices for spin-1/2 two-state systems.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2475] viXra:1806.0181 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-13 23:58:53

Fractal Structure of the Spacetime, the Fundamentally Broken Symmetry

Authors: Victor Paromov
Comments: 15 Pages.

It is expected that the full unification is achievable within a quantum field theory “beyond the SM” (Standard Model). An alternative approach is the Kaluza-Klein (KK) extension of the General Relativity (GR) with extra dimensions. However, there is a third possibility that no unification is achievable due to the specific fractal structure of the spacetime and the unique position of the observer situated inside the ordinary (gravitational) subspace and outside the compact extra dimensions, the geometry of which governs particle interactions. The Fractal spacetime concept (FSC) is proposed in order to support the General principle of interaction (GPI), which postulates that all the nature’s forces with no exceptions are governed by the spacetime geometry. The FSC postulates that the spacetime includes three separate subspaces (in addition to the time dimension): the three-dimensional ordinary subspace, the atomic-sized fifth dimension sufficient to explain the electromagnetism, and the set of three nuclear-sized dimensions sufficient to explain the nuclear forces. The spacetime has a simple fractal structure: each of the three subspaces presumably has a spherical shape with the sizes decreased tremendously from one subspace to another. The size differences are responsible for the separation of the subspaces and gradually increased action powers of the three fundamental fields: gravitational, electroweak and strong fields. The present letter shows that the SM equations actually describe the extradimensional spacetime deformations approximated as the gauge quantum fields. With the geometrical approach, the SM can be simplified, as only four types of elementary spacetime deformations (extradimensional waves) are needed: electron, positron, uuu, and ūūū quark triplets. All other elementary particles including photons and gluons are binding states or/and wave polarization modes of the above-mentioned waves. The neutrinos, the weak bosons, and the Higg’s particle are avoided. All particles’ interactions are governed by the positive or negative extradimensional curvatures and the spin-related torsion induced in the nuclear or electromagnetic subspace by the color or electric charges (respectively). The particles’ gravitational interactions are governed by the charge-induced deformations of the ordinary subspace described by the Higg’s field. With the FSC, the GPI explains the geometry-based unified nature of all known interactions. However, a single unified field theory is not possible in principle due to the observational difference between the large geometry of the ordinary subspace and the compact geometry of the extra dimensions. Thus, in general, the FSC supports both the GR and the SM. In special cases, however, it will require quantum field descriptions of gravitational interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2474] viXra:1806.0172 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-12 13:00:49

Quantum LEGO

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

The results expand the set of available tools for the 'quantum LEGO' of building ultracold molecules from atoms. [27] A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2473] viXra:1806.0170 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-12 13:24:17

Quantum Puddles

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

A team of physicists at the University of Vermont have discovered a fundamentally new way surfaces can get wet. [28] The results expand the set of available tools for the 'quantum LEGO' of building ultracold molecules from atoms. [27] A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2472] viXra:1806.0155 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-11 08:40:43

Photon Leaks for Quantum Supremacy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

A team of researchers from China, Germany and the U.S. has found that boson sampling with photons is a viable option for testing for quantum supremacy, despite photons leaking from a given test system. [37] A new theoretical model involves squeezing light to just the right amount to accurately transmit information using subatomic particles. [36] The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing—quantum chemistry—would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2471] viXra:1806.0153 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-11 09:39:16

Quantum Behavior in Nanocrystal

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

A new experiment that tests the limit of how large an object can be before it ceases to behave quantum mechanically has been proposed by physicists in the UK and India. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16] Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2470] viXra:1806.0142 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-12 04:57:32

Multiple Laser a Single Microcomb

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Researchers have now shown that all these lasers can be replaced by a single device called a microcomb. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2469] viXra:1806.0133 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-10 19:57:03

The Structures of Particles Traveling at the Speed of Light

Authors: Tong Wang
Comments: 5 Pages. Photon structure, massless electric charge, Yinon, Masson

From the implications of special relativity, we know photons are massless. However, we also observe light being bent by the gravity of large bodies. To reconcile these two contradicting facts, here we propose a new model of photons using the idea of negative mass—a concept mentioned in the theory of gravitation—to explain this paradox of light. As a combination of mass and negative mass, a photon can have zero net inertial mass, yet simultaneously, move toward gravitational bodies. Furthermore, we will also introduce here several novel configurations of particles traveling at the speed of light, which have remarkable implications.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2468] viXra:1806.0124 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-09 06:33:45

Quantum Spin Liquids in Ferromagnets

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S. and Russia has found evidence that suggests spin liquids in ferromagnets may be similar to dipole liquids in ferroelectrics. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2467] viXra:1806.0119 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-09 10:22:47

The Pauli Objection Addressed in a Logical Way

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 4 Pages.

One of the greatest unsolved problems in quantum mechanics is related to time operators. Since the Pauli objection was first raised in 1933, time has only been considered a parameter in quantum mechanics and not as an operator. The Pauli objection basically asserts that a time operator must be Hermitian and self-adjoint, something the Pauli objection points out is actually not possible. Some theorists have gone so far as to claim that time between events does not exist in the quantum world. Others have explored various ideas to establish an acceptable type of time operator, such as a dynamic time operator, or an external clock that stands just outside the framework of the Pauli objection. However, none of these methods seem to be completely sound. We think that a better approach is to develop a deeper understanding of how elementary particles can be seen, themselves, as ticking clocks, and to examine more broadly how they relate to time.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2466] viXra:1806.0112 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-09 22:54:56

3rd Edition - Theory of the Quantum Physics of Potentisation of Homeopathic Medicine

Authors: Christina Munns, Dip. Hom.
Comments: 8 Pages.

This article is written with the intention of explaining the dynamics of the process of potentisation of a homeopathic medicine at the quantum scale. It is proposed as a theory at present, since it has not yet been scientifically proven to be correct by undergoing experimentation in a quantum scale research laboratory. This paper represents the second revision of this theory, since new information has come to light regarding the true nature of the quantum mechanics of the succussion process and the reason why electrons are able to remain in the excited state. I propose that the key to understanding how homeopathic medicines operate is through the understanding of quantum mechanics. When the understanding of quantum mechanics is applied to the process of homeopathic potentisation (i.e. succussion and dilution), one can apprehend how a homeopathic medicine is able to become increasingly more powerful (and thus potentially more curative) the more times it is succussed and diluted. Of particular importance are the dynamics of electrons within the quantum state, since it is these free-standing fundamental particles that configure themselves in increasingly larger and larger numbers with each increasing orbital number, with each subsequent succussion process. With each increase in orbital size there is a concomitant increase in the energy and informational capacity of the atom, which correlates to an increase in the homeopathic potency.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2465] viXra:1806.0106 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-08 19:12:04

The Wavefunction as an Energy Propagation Mechanism

Authors: Jean Louis Van Belle MAEc BAEc BPhil
Comments: 10 Pages. None.

Benefitting from valuable feedback, this article corrects some defects in the physical interpretation of the wavefunction that I had offered – and elaborated upon – in two previous pre-publication papers (see: http://vixra.org/abs/1709.0390 and http://vixra.org/abs/1712.0201). Most importantly, this paper incorporates relativistically correct formulas for the proposed interpretation of the energy of an electron as a two-dimensional oscillation of a pointlike charge in space. The relativistic correction does not change any of the conclusions. For example, the interpretation of the wavefunction as an energy diffusion equation still holds. However, this paper defines the weaknesses in the approach (read: the agenda for my personal future research) much better. I have benefited a lot from comments on the previous papers and, therefore, I hope I will get the same enthusiastic reaction to this one.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2464] viXra:1806.0105 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-08 20:47:36

Why The Planck Charge Is Approximately 11 Times the Electron Charge

Authors: Jonathan Deutsch
Comments: 2 Pages.

WHY THE PLANCK CHARGE IS APPROXIMATELY 11 TIMES THE ELECTRON CHARGE ABSTRACT The Planck charge, qp, and the electron charge, e, can each be quantized based on melectron = 1, on the deBroglie wavelength of the electron (=λelectron = h/ melecttronc) = ─1 and on telectron (=λe;lectron/c) = . When we do this, we see that e2 equals a bit more than 1/1000 pure number. 2πe2 thus equals about 7/1000, which equals approximately 1/137. Therefore, the inverse of 2πe2 = approximately 137, so (1/2πe2)1/2 = approximately 11. Now qp = [(1/2πe2)(hc)]e, but similar quantization of hc yields a product of (─ )( ) = 1. Therefore, qp = [(1/2πe2)1/2(hc)]e = (1/2πe2)1/2e = approximately 11 times the electron charge.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2463] viXra:1806.0103 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-09 03:07:03

Faster Silicon Qubits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

Quantum bits are now easier to manipulate for devices in quantum computing, thanks to enhanced spin-orbit interaction in silicon. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2462] viXra:1806.0094 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-07 07:24:18

Laser Gas Hound

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

University of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can "smell" different gases within a sample. [14] Scientists at Osaka University discovered a novel particle acceleration mechanism they describe as a micro-bubble implosion, in which super-high energy hydrogen ions (relativistic protons) are emitted at the moment when bubbles shrink to atomic size through the irradiation of hydrides with micron-sized spherical bubbles by ultraintense laser pulses [13] Conventional electron accelerators have become an indispensable tool in modern research. [12] An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde. [11] Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light-light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. [10] Tiny micro-and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties. [9] A team of researchers led by Leo Kouwenhoven at TU Delft has demonstrated an on-chip microwave laser based on a fundamental property of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect. They embedded a small section of an interrupted superconductor, a Josephson junction, in a carefully engineered on-chip cavity. Such a device opens the door to many applications in which microwave radiation with minimal dissipation is key, for example in controlling qubits in a scalable quantum computer. [8]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2461] viXra:1806.0087 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-07 12:25:11

Structure of Physical Reality

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 17 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

Obviously, physical reality possesses structure, and this structure founds on one or more foundations. These foundations are rather simple and easily comprehensible. The major foundation evolves like a seed into more complicated levels of the structure, such that after a series of steps a structure results that appears like the structure of the physical reality that humans can partly observe. To show the power of this approach the paper explains the origin of gravity and the fine structure of photons and elementary particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2460] viXra:1806.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-08 01:43:51

Laser Makes Silicon Sing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 26 Pages.

Yale scientists have created a new type of silicon laser that uses sounds waves to amplify light. A study about the discovery appears June 8 in the online edition of the journal Science. [15] University of Adelaide researchers have created a laser that can "smell" different gases within a sample. [14] Scientists at Osaka University discovered a novel particle acceleration mechanism they describe as a micro-bubble implosion, in which super-high energy hydrogen ions (relativistic protons) are emitted at the moment when bubbles shrink to atomic size through the irradiation of hydrides with micron-sized spherical bubbles by ultraintense laser pulses [13] Conventional electron accelerators have become an indispensable tool in modern research. [12] An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde. [11] Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light-light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. [10] Tiny micro-and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties. [9] A team of researchers led by Leo Kouwenhoven at TU Delft has demonstrated an on-chip microwave laser based on a fundamental property of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect. They embedded a small section of an interrupted superconductor, a Josephson junction, in a carefully engineered on-chip cavity. Such a device opens the door to many applications in which microwave radiation with minimal dissipation is key, for example in controlling qubits in a scalable quantum computer. [8]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2459] viXra:1806.0081 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-08 02:57:53

Periodic Table Limits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Michigan State University professor probes the table's limits in a recent Nature Physics Perspective. [30] A team of researchers at Pfizer, the pharmaceutical giant, has developed an automated flow chemistry system that is capable of carrying out 1500 reactions over a 24-hour period. [29] Prof WANG Zhisong and his research team from the Department of Physics, NUS have developed two sets of conceptually new mechanisms that enable artificial nanowalkers to move in a self-guided direction using their internal mechanics. [28] Gene editing is one of the hottest topics in cancer research. A Chinese research team has now developed a gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional vehicle to transport the "gene scissors" to the tumor cell genome. [27] Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza, and other serious conditions – thanks to a breakthrough in synthetic biology by the University of Warwick. [26] This "robot," made of a single strand of DNA, can autonomously "walk" around a surface, pick up certain molecules and drop them off in designated locations. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2458] viXra:1806.0077 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-06 05:35:35

Quantum Information Sound

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

Quantum physics has led to new types of sensors, secure data transmission methods and researchers are working toward computers. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2457] viXra:1806.0074 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-06 12:56:54

Quantum Magnets Mimic Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

What is light? It sounds like a simple question, but it is one that has occupied some of the best scientific minds for centuries. [26] Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16] Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2456] viXra:1806.0073 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-06 13:34:33

Matter: How to Count It? and an Introduction to Quantum Different Phases of Matter

Authors: Peiman Ghasemi
Comments: 4 Pages.

Today scientists believe that all “particles” also have a “wave nature” (and vice versa). This phenomenon has been verified not only for elementary particles, but also for the elementary particles that exist in compound particles like molecules and even atoms. You can consider light (the photons of the light beams) as a “wave-like energy”. This energy is a wave–particle, just containing elementary matter and speed. We can use Einstein, Planck equations to determine the amount of the energy which make up a sample photon. But, to date we cannot measure the matter, therefore we make a simple unit that let us to measure the matter.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2455] viXra:1806.0064 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-05 08:32:28

Hidden by Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

Using the physics equivalent of the strobe photography that captures every twitch of a cheetah in full sprint, researchers have used ultrafast spectroscopy to visualize electrons interacting as a hidden state of matter in a superconductive alloy. [36] Physicists at the University of Zurich are researching a new class of materials: Higher-order topological insulators. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2454] viXra:1806.0060 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-05 09:06:10

Atomic Clock of Einstein's Elevator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

By comparing different types of remote atomic clocks, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have performed the most accurate test ever of a key principle underlying Albert Einstein's famous theory of general relativity, which describes how gravity relates to space and time. [29] "As crazy as all this looks, there appears to be strong reliability in these behaviors that could even be predictably and practically manipulated," Landman said. [28] A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. [27] For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2453] viXra:1806.0058 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-05 11:30:35

Quantum Stopwatch Memory

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

Physicists have developed a "quantum stopwatch"—a method that stores time (in the form of states of quantum clocks) in a quantum memory. [17] Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2452] viXra:1806.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-05 12:01:08

Birth and Death of a Phonon

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Phonons are discrete units of vibrational energy predicted by quantum mechanics that correspond to collective oscillations of atoms inside a molecule or a crystal. [25] This achievement is considered as an important landmark for the realization of practical application of photon upconversion technology. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16] Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. [15] Just like in normal road traffic, crossings are indispensable in optical signal processing. In order to avoid collisions, a clear traffic rule is required. A new method has now been developed at TU Wien to provide such a rule for light signals. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2451] viXra:1806.0054 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-05 23:03:22

Take a Picture of an Electron to Refute the Uncertainty Principle © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

We evaluate the unoriginal thought experiment of taking a picture of an electron in a vacuum. To take a picture of an electron requires shining light on it. The state of the electron is therefore combined with that of the photon wave to produce a combined state. The combined state may be additive or multiplicative. A theorem is derivable by trial and error for both of these states. Other theorems as co-equal thereto. We derive the electron state back out of the combined states of the theorem(s) by logically removing the light state. The equation is inversive and is tautologous. This means the state of indeterminancy to take a picture of an electron using light is invertible. Therefore, the uncertainty principle is logically contradicted.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2450] viXra:1806.0042 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-04 08:04:14

Quantum Schizophrenia

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

"As crazy as all this looks, there appears to be strong reliability in these behaviors that could even be predictably and practically manipulated," Landman said. [28] A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. [27] For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2449] viXra:1806.0039 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-04 10:21:18

New Way Light Interact with Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

A new way of enhancing the interactions between light and matter, developed by researchers at MIT and Israel's Technion, could someday lead to more efficient solar cells that collect a wider range of light wavelengths, and new kinds of lasers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that could have fully tunable color emissions. [17] A team of researchers at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have developed a method to measure the shape of laser pulses in ambient air. [16] Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays. [15] In a laboratory at the University of Rochester, researchers are using lasers to change the surface of metals in incredible ways, such as making them super water-repellent without the use of special coatings, paints, or solvents. [14] The interaction of high-power laser light sources with matter has given rise to numerous applications including; fast ion acceleration; intense X-ray, gamma-ray, positron and neutron generation; and fast-ignition-based laser fusion. [13] Conventional electron accelerators have become an indispensable tool in modern research. [12] An outstanding conundrum on what happens to the laser energy after beams are fired into plasma has been solved in newly-published research at the University of Strathclyde. [11] Researchers at Lund University and Louisiana State University have developed a tool that makes it possible to control extreme UV light-light with much shorter wavelengths than visible light. [10] Tiny micro-and nanoscale structures within a material's surface are invisible to the naked eye, but play a big role in determining a material's physical, chemical, and biomedical properties. [9] A team of researchers led by Leo Kouwenhoven at TU Delft has demonstrated an on-chip microwave laser based on a fundamental property of superconductivity, the ac Josephson effect. They embedded a small section of an interrupted superconductor, a Josephson junction, in a carefully engineered on-chip cavity. Such a device opens the door to many applications in which microwave radiation with minimal dissipation is key, for example in controlling qubits in a scalable quantum computer. [8]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2448] viXra:1806.0038 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-04 10:42:41

3-D Quantum Memory

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Physicists have designed a 3-D quantum memory that addresses the tradeoff between achieving long storage times and fast readout times, while at the same time maintaining a compact form. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2447] viXra:1806.0025 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-04 00:46:57

Aether is Heat Capacity Per Linear Meter

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 4 Pages.

Aether is Heat Capacity per linear meter This Heat Capacity Causes an "Extinction Horizon" of 13.88805 Billion Light Years & the Hubble Red-shift seen as an Expanding Universe
Category: Quantum Physics

[2446] viXra:1806.0020 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-02 10:37:02

Advances of the New Century: It’s All About the Wavefunction

Authors: Peter Cameron, Michaele Suisse
Comments: 7 Pages.

The 2018 Physics Today essay competition invites participants to identify a ‘significant advance’ in his or her field since the millennium that deserves wider recognition among non-experts, and to write an essay that describes the advance, how it was made, and why it’s important[1]. This essay takes quantum mechanics to be the field of interest, introducing ‘non-experts’ to a new synthesis of math and physics, of geometry and fields, a computationally precise yet intuitive representation of wavefunctions and their interactions at all scales, allowing for a common sense interpretation of quantum phenomena and resolution of most if not all quantum paradoxes. It’s all about the wavefunction, the foundation, fundamental, quantum philosophy, quantum logic. As yet we are all non-experts.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2445] viXra:1806.0017 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-02 12:22:34

Once More About Quantum "Entanglement" (English Version)

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 16 Pages. English

During the conceptual design of the experimental results of Aspect one must speak the language of quantum mechanics, not the language Argo of the private insights. One of these insights is the concept of "entanglement" (of particles or states is unclear!) The language of quantum mechanics allows for a clear and unambiguous manner to give concrete content to the questions on this occasion. For the analysis of the proposed elementary model used in [1, 2].
Category: Quantum Physics

[2444] viXra:1806.0004 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-01 06:22:46

Squeeze for Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A new theoretical model involves squeezing light to just the right amount to accurately transmit information using subatomic particles. [36] The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing—quantum chemistry—would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2443] viXra:1806.0003 [pdf] submitted on 2018-06-01 07:28:24

Quantum Securing Blockchain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Although blockchain is traditionally seen as secure, it is vulnerable to attack from quantum computers. [37] A new theoretical model involves squeezing light to just the right amount to accurately transmit information using subatomic particles. [36] The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing—quantum chemistry—would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2442] viXra:1805.0547 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-31 08:54:04

Quantum Computer Chemistry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

The standard approach to building a quantum computer with majoranas as building blocks is to convert them into qubits. However, a promising application of quantum computing—quantum chemistry—would require these qubits to be converted again into so-called fermions. [35] Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2441] viXra:1805.0540 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-30 07:00:04

Macroscopic Quantum Coherence

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Tarucha, the leader of the team, says, "This is a very exciting finding, as it could potentially help to accelerate research into scaling up semiconductor quantum computers, allowing us to solve scientific problems that are very tough on conventional computer systems." [29] Physicists at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have succeeded in entangling a single atom with a single photon in the telecom wavelength range. [28] A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. [27] For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2440] viXra:1805.0535 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-30 13:10:48

Quantum Virtual Movies

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

Scientists have shown how an optical chip can simulate the motion of atoms within molecules at the quantum level, which could lead to better ways of creating chemicals for use as pharmaceuticals. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2439] viXra:1805.0515 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-28 07:24:50

Time Crystals in Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

An Aalto University study has provided new evidence that time crystals can physically exist – a claim currently under hot debate. [25] Yale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal—a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse—in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2438] viXra:1805.0514 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-28 07:53:39

Magnetization by Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

The production of devices to store or transmit information is one of the most frequent technological applications of magnetism. [16] Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2437] viXra:1805.0513 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-28 08:27:27

Double Slit Experiment Explained by the Principle of Complementary and the Doppler Effect

Authors: Mugur B. Răuţ
Comments: 4 Pages.

In this paper I propose an explanation of the double slit experiment results, considered in a general form, in terms of the Doppler effect, as a consequence of applying the principle of complementarity. It is shown that, if we accept the fact that both particle and wave are manifestations of the same conceptual whole, in the general form of the particle-wave dualism, then the Doppler effect will be a manifestation for both wave and particle, and the double slit experiment will be a qualitative illustration of this fact.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2436] viXra:1805.0510 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-28 09:45:59

Some Topological Paradoxes of Relativity (Epr)-II. (English Version)

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 6 Pages. in English

To turn again to the article of A. Aspect "BELL's THEOREM: the naive view of the experimenter" we were forced by some publications, for example, [2]. We were convinced once again of the conceptual correctness of the problem of EPR in the Aspect's article. Conceptually, in the "naive presentation of EPR" from A. Aspect no "gluing" of probability measures in different spaces is not required. The presentation of the A. Aspect is logically closed and complete. By simple examples, the existence of a problem related to the violation of bell's inequality is shown. The proposed article has all the logical "moments" , each of which can be said - it is not so! It should be emphasized that none of the points [2] was "glued" to any of our "moments".
Category: Quantum Physics

[2435] viXra:1805.0492 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-29 07:34:07

Switch Control Spin Current

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have discovered a switch to control the spin current, a mechanism needed for information processing with full spin-based devices. [19] Particles can exchange their spin, and in this way spin currents can be formed in a material. [18] Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. [17] The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2434] viXra:1805.0488 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-27 08:14:29

Quantum Computing of Atomic Nucleus

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer. [29] A collaboration of scientists led by Google, and including physicists from Leiden University and TU Delft, have developed a practice tool for chemists called OpenFermion. [28] Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are conducting fundamental physics research that will lead to more control over mercurial quantum systems and materials. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2433] viXra:1805.0466 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-27 05:08:59

Black Holes and Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Rotating black holes and computers that use quantum-mechanical phenomena to process information are topics that have fascinated science lovers for decades, but even the most innovative thinkers rarely put them together. [20] If someone were to venture into one of these relatively benign black holes, they could survive, but their past would be obliterated and they could have an infinite number of possible futures. [19] The group explains their theory in a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters—it involves the idea of primordial black holes (PBHs) infesting the centers of neutron stars and eating them from the inside out. [18] But for rotating black holes, there's a region outside the event horizon where strange and extraordinary things can happen, and these extraordinary possibilities are the focus of a new paper in the American Physical Society journal Physical Review Letters. [17] Astronomers have constructed the first map of the universe based on the positions of supermassive black holes, which reveals the large-scale structure of the universe. [16] Astronomers want to record an image of the heart of our galaxy for the first time: a global collaboration of radio dishes is to take a detailed look at the black hole which is assumed to be located there. [15] A team of researchers from around the world is getting ready to create what might be the first image of a black hole. [14] "There seems to be a mysterious link between the amount of dark matter a galaxy holds and the size of its central black hole, even though the two operate on vastly different scales," said Akos Bogdan of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). [13] If dark matter comes in both matter and antimatter varieties, it might accumulate inside dense stars to create black holes. [12] For a long time, there were two main theories related to how our universe would end. These were the Big Freeze and the Big Crunch. In short, the Big Crunch claimed that the universe would eventually stop expanding and collapse in on itself. This collapse would result in…well…a big crunch (for lack of a better term). Think " the Big Bang " , except just the opposite. That's essentially what the Big Crunch is. On the other hand, the Big Freeze claimed that the universe would continue expanding forever, until the cosmos becomes a frozen wasteland. This theory asserts that stars will get farther and farther apart, burn out, and (since there are no more stars bring born) the universe will grown entirely cold and eternally black. [11] Newly published research reveals that dark matter is being swallowed up by dark energy, offering novel insight into the nature of dark matter and dark energy and what the future of our Universe might be. [10] The gravitational force attracting the matter, causing concentration of the matter in a small space and leaving much space with low matter concentration: dark matter and energy. There is an asymmetry between the mass of the electric charges, for example proton and electron, can understood by the asymmetrical Planck Distribution Law. This temperature dependent energy distribution is asymmetric around the maximum intensity, where the annihilation of matter and antimatter is a high probability event. The asymmetric sides are creating different frequencies of electromagnetic radiations being in the same intensity level and compensating each other. One of these compensating ratios is the electron – proton mass ratio. The lower energy side has no compensating intensity level, it is the dark energy and the corresponding matter is the dark matter.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2432] viXra:1805.0442 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 05:35:20

Spin Current

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

Particles can exchange their spin, and in this way spin currents can be formed in a material. [18] Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. [17] The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2431] viXra:1805.0441 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 06:06:19

Quantum Effects in Photosynthesis

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Molecules that are involved in photosynthesis exhibit the same quantum effects as non-living matter, concludes an international team of scientists including University of Groningen theoretical physicist Thomas la Cour Jansen. [29] Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80% of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2430] viXra:1805.0439 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 08:46:21

Really Quantum Memory

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

Quantum memories are devices that can store quantum information for a later time, which are usually implemented by storing and re-emitting photons with certain quantum states. [15] The researchers engineered diamond strings that can be tuned to quiet a qubit's environment and improve memory from tens to several hundred nanoseconds, enough time to do many operations on a quantum chip. [14] Intel has announced the design and fabrication of a 49-qubit superconducting quantum-processor chip at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. To improve our understanding of the so-called quantum properties of materials, scientists at the TU Delft investigated thin slices of SrIrO3, a material that belongs to the family of complex oxides. [12] New research carried out by CQT researchers suggest that standard protocols that measure the dimensions of quantum systems may return incorrect numbers. [11] Is entanglement really necessary for describing the physical world, or is it possible to have some post-quantum theory without entanglement? [10] A trio of scientists who defied Einstein by proving the nonlocal nature of quantum entanglement will be honoured with the John Stewart Bell Prize from the University of Toronto (U of T). [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2429] viXra:1805.0438 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 09:10:37

About the EPR Paradox. Resolution Features. (English Version)

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 6 Pages. English

In interpreting the results of experiments A. Aspect faced two concepts of quantum mechanics and relativity theory, which requires a thorough consideration of the causes of contradictions. The analysis of these issues devoted many works of different authors, and the points raised here also have been exhibited for analysis. However, we feel that contact again to the key moments of the contradiction and possibly in compressed form is a must.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2428] viXra:1805.0434 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 13:58:46

Refutation of the Quantum Probability Rule © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The equation evaluated is not tautologous and hence is not established to be linear, and continuity (or homogeneity) of f cannot be proved therefrom. Remark: In 1935 von Neumann stopped "believing" in Hilbert space. Rosinger, E.E. (2004). What is wrong with von Neumann's theorem on "no hidden variables". arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0408191, quoting: Birkhoff, G.D. (1961). Proceedings of Symposia in Pure Mathematics. 2:158, American Mathematical Society, with the respective letter dated 13 November 1935.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2427] viXra:1805.0424 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-24 01:08:48

Refutation of the Quantum Qutrit Ternary Probability © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

From the arguments, two equations as rendered are not tautologous. To weaken the argument, we test the sum of the propositions of the outcomes to be greater than one as tautologous, because after all that is the state supposedly observed by experiment. Remarks: The cited paper was paid for by the governments of China, Hungry, Spain, Sweden. The footnoted data set link at personal.us.es/adan/binary.htm is a table of 16 columns and 4500 rows. We could not replicate the χ2-values in Table II. Consequently, we applied the N-by-M contingency test (superset of Chi-squared test with expected values derived from observed values) on the first 1000 rows. We found Fisher P <= 01, χ2 = 0.0000001; df = 14,985. In other words, the data set as published is random data. We conclude this impugns the data collection, data set, results, and entire experiment.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2426] viXra:1805.0417 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-24 08:26:21

Avogadro Constant in Combat with Atomic Mass Unit

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 2 Pages.

In May 2019 a new value for the Avogadro constant will be introduced. However its proposed value is in contradiction with the value of the atomic mass unit, whichever amu is taken: the one based on normal mass values, or the one based on mass values influenced by binding energies in atomic nuclei, via E(nergy) = mc2. This article presents an alternative approach.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2425] viXra:1805.0415 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-24 09:41:39

Erase a Quantum Bit

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

The minimum amount energy needed to erase a quantum bit (qubit) of information has been measured for the first time. [36] It may sound like the stuff of fairy tales, but in the 1950s two numerical models initially developed as a pet project by physicists led to the birth of an entirely new field of physics: computational statistical mechanics. [35] New research gives insight into a recent experiment that was able to manipulate an unprecedented number of atoms through a quantum simulator. This new theory could provide another step on the path to creating the elusive quantum computers. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2424] viXra:1805.0414 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-24 12:26:01

Exploring the Origin of Gravity

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 5 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

Physicists assume that the origin of gravity is still obscure. However, since more than two centuries the essence of the origin of gravity occurs in scientific papers. The interpretation of this root is not straightforward and telling the whole story requires a solid mathematical model.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2423] viXra:1805.0407 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-21 09:33:54

Ternary Quantum Entanglement

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2422] viXra:1805.0405 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-21 12:49:30

Quantum Entanglement Upside Down

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. [27] For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2421] viXra:1805.0396 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-22 05:52:35

High-Speed Optical Communication

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

Graphene Flagship researchers have shown for the first time gate tunable third harmonic generation in graphene. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2420] viXra:1805.0393 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-22 06:45:18

Pendulum Represents Binary Quantum State of Oscillations

Authors: Masataka Ohta
Comments: 2 Pages.

There is a straightforward correspondence between superposition of polarization modes of photons and that of classical radio waves. While classical particles cannot be superpositioned, classical waves can be, which is within classical intuition. Even more intuitively, two dimensional oscillations of a pendulum represent oscillating binary quantum states such as polarization states of photons.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2419] viXra:1805.0392 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-22 06:49:21

Qubit as a Polarization Division Multiplexed Quadrature Amplitude Modulated Symbol of Light

Authors: Masataka Ohta
Comments: 5 Pages.

With optical communication technology today, it is practical to communicate with polarization division multiplexed (PDM) quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) symbols, which are quantum superposition of horizontally and vertically polarized photons, which are, so called, qubits. As the number of bits encoded by a PDM QAM symbol is limited, according to Shannon-Hartley theorem, by signal to noise ratio, the degree of parallelism of quantum computers is limited. The result is consistent with quantum threshold theorem. Quantum entanglement between qubits only makes the number of bits encoded by the qubits smaller, because entanglement means correlation between the qubits. Thus, quantum computers are not more powerful than classical ones. Finally, it is shown that purely classical computers can be arbitrarily fast and ideal, that is, noiseless, quantum computers are classical.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2418] viXra:1805.0383 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-22 10:31:27

Refutation of the Born Rule in Eqm as the Probability of the Wave Function Squared © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The equation as rendered is not tautologous, and differs from contradictory by two values.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2417] viXra:1805.0376 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-23 01:58:19

Quantum Repeater

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Physicists at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have succeeded in entangling a single atom with a single photon in the telecom wavelength range. [28] A team of physicists from ICTP-Trieste and IQOQI-Innsbruck has come up with a surprisingly simple idea to investigate quantum entanglement of many particles. [27] For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated ternary—rather than binary—quantum correlations between entangled objects. [26] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2416] viXra:1805.0375 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-20 09:03:40

Some Topological Paradoxes of Relativity (Epr). (English Version)/

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 18 Pages. In English

In the footsteps of the article by A. Aspect "BELL'S THEOREM: the naive view of an experimentalist". As in equation (23) has detected an error (or typo), I took the trouble to verify calculations from 1 to 5 sections of the article. Are some clarifying points that are important for understanding the essence. Given an elementary conclusion of formulas (3), which is omitted in the article. The Bell's inequality, derived on the basis of the general model for a dichotomous variable, disturbed the quantum mechanical model for a pair of "entangled" photons. In Bell's article it is clearly (though not very detailed) shown. No " artificial gadgets" is not able to resolve this contradiction. The only thing that causes confusion is the procedure of creating a mixed state of two photons and the essence conceptual view of mathematics experiment. Theoretically, this procedure can be represented as a symmetrization of the wave function of the pair. However, how does the transfer of this idea to the technical essence of the experiment is unclear.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2415] viXra:1805.0366 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-21 04:40:29

Quantum Dots from Tea

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80% of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2414] viXra:1805.0356 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-20 04:11:21

Quantum Probability Rule

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [25] Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2413] viXra:1805.0348 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-18 04:25:56

The Shape of Laser Pulses

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

A team of researchers at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have developed a method to measure the shape of laser pulses in ambient air. [16] Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays. [15] In a laboratory at the University of Rochester, researchers are using lasers to change the surface of metals in incredible ways, such as making them super water-repellent without the use of special coatings, paints, or solvents. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2412] viXra:1805.0340 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-18 12:18:13

PMC-Topology (English Version)

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 2 Pages. English

In the mathematical description of physical phenomena is used mainly Point-Metric Classical topology (PMC-topology), embodied in the methods of mathematical analysis. It is necessary to note the important features of the application of PMC-topology to the solution of the problems of space-time relations, which will give us an unambiguous hint at the limitations of its applicability. To understand the reason for this limitation, it is necessary to return to the origins of the continuity concept of point-metric classical topology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2411] viXra:1805.0328 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-17 05:22:42

Quantum Entangled Atomic Clouds

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Unlike previous methods of quantum entanglement involving incoherent and thermal clouds of particles, in this experiment, the researchers used a cloud of atoms in the Bose-Einstein condensate state. [38] A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. [37] Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2410] viXra:1805.0323 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-18 04:08:03

Quantum Drum Vibrate and Stand

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 36 Pages.

Researchers have studied how a 'drumstick' made of light could make a microscopic 'drum' vibrate and stand still at the same time. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15] Who is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2409] viXra:1805.0320 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-16 08:19:34

Quantum Entangled Atoms

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. [37] Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2408] viXra:1805.0314 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-15 08:21:17

FWT-Theorem, the One-Particle Contextuality, Two-Particle Nonlocality, Entanglement, Wheeler's Experiments with Delayed Choice, and All that ...

Authors: V.A. Kasimov.
Comments: 4 Pages. English

In continuation of the discussion of the results of the Aspect's experiments. An overview of the new results.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2407] viXra:1805.0309 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-15 11:47:02

Quantum Phases for Moving Charges and Dipoles in an Electromagnetic Field and Fundamental Equations of Quantum Mechanics

Authors: A.L. Kholmetskii, O.V. Missevitch, T. Yarman, M. Arik
Comments: 12 Pages.

We analyze the quantum phase effects for point-like charges and electric (magnetic) dipoles under a natural assumption that the observed phase for a dipole represents the sum of corresponding phases for charges composing this dipole. This way we disclose two novel quantum phases for charged particles, which we named as complementary electric Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) phase and complementary magnetic A-B phase, respectively. We reveal that these phases are derived from the Schrödinger equation only in the case, where the operator of momentum is re-defined via the replacement of the canonical momentum of particle by the sum of its mechanical momentum and interactional field momentum for a system of charged particles. The related alteration should be made in Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, too, and implications of this modification are discussed.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2406] viXra:1805.0308 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-15 11:53:22

Quantum-Enhanced Sensors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15] Who is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [14] Machine learning algorithms are designed to improve as they encounter more data, making them a versatile technology for understanding large sets of photos such as those accessible from Google Images.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2405] viXra:1805.0301 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-16 05:08:56

Atomic Microcosmos

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

Nürnberg (FAU) have successfully generated controlled electron pulses in the attosecond range. [24] A University of Oklahoma physicist, Alberto M. Marino, is developing quantum-enhanced sensors that could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. [23] A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15] Who is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2404] viXra:1805.0300 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 12:36:10

Analog Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2403] viXra:1805.0292 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-15 01:57:06

Revisiting the Derivation of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle: The Collapse of Uncertainty at the Planck Scale

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 10 Pages.

In this paper we will revisit the derivation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. We will see how the Heisenberg principle collapses at the Planck scale by introducing a minor modification. The beauty of our suggested modification is that it does not change the main equations in quantum mechanics; it only gives them a Planck scale limit where uncertainty collapses. We suspect that Einstein could have been right after all, when he stated, ``God does not throw dice." His now-famous saying was an expression of his skepticism towards the concept that quantum randomness could be the ruling force, even at the deepest levels of reality. Here we will explore the quantum realm with a fresh perspective, by re-deriving the Heisenberg principle in relation to the Planck scale. Our modified theory indicates that renormalization is no longer needed. Further, Bell's Inequality no longer holds, as the breakdown of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle at the Planck scale opens up the possibility for hidden variable theories. The theory also suggests that the superposition principle collapses at the Planck scale. Further, we show how this idea leads to an upper boundary on uncertainty, in addition to the lower boundary. These upper and lower boundaries are identical for the Planck mass particle; in fact, they are zero, and this highlights the truly unique nature of the Planck mass particle.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2402] viXra:1805.0281 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-13 08:09:43

What is a Wave Function?

Authors: Christina Munns
Comments: 14 Pages. Non-commercial licence. All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 Christina Munns

ABSTRACT This paper addresses the historical inconsistencies that arise from the lack of definition of the wave function by Edwin Schrödinger in his wave equations, along with the associated misperception of the exact description of the superposition state and whether or not this state is random or deterministic in character. A redefinition of the wave function is proposed as being the hidden variables existing within the quantum superposition state. This definition is in coherence with actual quantum research. The hidden variables existing within the superposition state are defined. The inconsistencies of the concept of the wave-particle duality are also explained and reasons given why the wave and particle states are discrete.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2401] viXra:1805.0257 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 08:57:55

Emergence of Spatio-Temporal Certainty (1+2+3)-English

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 24 Pages. English

The well - known philosophical formula: "Space and time are universal forms of existence of matter" forces us to introduce several levels of representation of our knowledge about space-time relations, which we will conditionally call "levels of ontologization" of our understanding of these relations. These levels can be considered as ontological sections in the process of cognition of the essence of spatiotemporal relations and the formation of their conceptual certainty. A simple example is used to model the process of formation of spatiotemporal certainty in the Leibniz aspect: the transition from the quantum level (micro-) to the level of classical mechanics (macro-). In this regard, we can talk about the two-phase existence of matter. In addition, an attempt was made to outline the solution of space-time problems after work: "Contextuality of one particle, nonlocality of two particles, entanglement, Wheeler's experiments with delay of choice, FWT and so on ..."[12]. The current situation of the search for the essence of space-time relations resembles the early history of the search for the essence of "phlogiston", which was resolved by the statistical theory of Gibbs ensembles, the definition of thermodynamic concepts and, in particular, the concept of temperature as the average kinetic energy of the ensemble. It is quite possible that the spatiotemporal relations are also some averages from the eigenvalues of the quantum object operators.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2400] viXra:1805.0256 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 09:23:01

Quantum Process Rule

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 33 Pages.

The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2399] viXra:1805.0255 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 09:51:57

Two-Dimensional Quantum Walks

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

A team of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the University of Science and Technology of China has developed a chip that allows for two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons on a physical device. [22] The physicists, Sally Shrapnel, Fabio Costa, and Gerard Milburn, at The University of Queensland in Australia, have published a paper on the new quantum probability rule in the New Journal of Physics. [21] Probabilistic computing will allow future systems to comprehend and compute with uncertainties inherent in natural data, which will enable us to build computers capable of understanding, predicting and decision-making. [20] For years, the people developing artificial intelligence drew inspiration from what was known about the human brain, and it has enjoyed a lot of success as a result. Now, AI is starting to return the favor. [19] Scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), located at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have pioneered the use of GPU-accelerated deep learning for rapid detection and characterization of gravitational waves. [18] Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations. [17] Quantum computers can be made to utilize effects such as quantum coherence and entanglement to accelerate machine learning. [16] Neural networks learn how to carry out certain tasks by analyzing large amounts of data displayed to them. [15] Who is the better experimentalist, a human or a robot? When it comes to exploring synthetic and crystallization conditions for inorganic gigantic molecules, actively learning machines are clearly ahead, as demonstrated by British Scientists in an experiment with polyoxometalates published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. [14] Machine learning algorithms are designed to improve as they encounter more data, making them a versatile technology for understanding large sets of photos such as those accessible from Google Images. Elizabeth Holm, professor of materials science and engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, is leveraging this technology to better understand the enormous number of research images accumulated in the field of materials science. [13]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2398] viXra:1805.0254 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 10:28:53

Cyclic Molecule with a Twist

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

As suggested by their name, Möbius molecules have a twisted loop structure, a special characteristic with many potential applications. [27] Fullerenes are composed of 60 carbon atoms joined together in hexagonal rings to form a sphere that resembles a soccer ball. [26] Researchers at the University of Tokyo used an efficient method to create chiral materials using circularly polarized light. [25] Yale physicists have uncovered hints of a time crystal—a form of matter that "ticks" when exposed to an electromagnetic pulse—in the last place they expected: a crystal you might find in a child's toy. [24] The research shows that concentrated electrolytes in solution affect hydrogen bonding, ion interactions, and coordination geometries in currently unpredictable ways. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2397] viXra:1805.0252 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-14 11:00:15

Quantum Chaos Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

New research gives insight into a recent experiment that was able to manipulate an unprecedented number of atoms through a quantum simulator. This new theory could provide another step on the path to creating the elusive quantum computers. [34] Chinese scientists Xianmin Jin and his colleagues from Shanghai Jiao Tong University have successfully fabricated the largest-scaled quantum chip and demonstrated the first two-dimensional quantum walks of single photons in real spatial space, which may provide a powerful platform to boost analog quantum computing for quantum supremacy. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2396] viXra:1805.0238 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-11 09:42:35

Ultrafast Emergence of Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

UBC researchers have captured an unprecedented glimpse into the birth of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates, settling a scientific debate and uncovering new avenues to explore the potential of other unconventional superconductors. [19] A 2017 theory proposed by Rice University physicists to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, the "heavy fermion" compound known as CeCu2Si2. [18] Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. [17] The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2395] viXra:1805.0232 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-11 13:43:35

X-Rays Laser Through Water Window

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

Studying the fleeting actions of electrons in organic materials will now be much easier, thanks to a new method for generating fast X-rays. [15] In a laboratory at the University of Rochester, researchers are using lasers to change the surface of metals in incredible ways, such as making them super water-repellent without the use of special coatings, paints, or solvents. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2394] viXra:1805.0211 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-10 05:31:41

Multifunctional Photonic Devices

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

The USTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information has perfected a 4-port, all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2393] viXra:1805.0209 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-10 07:24:41

Light Make Computers Quantum

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

A technique to manipulate electrons with light could bring quantum computing up to room temperature. [34] The USTC Microcavity Research Group in the Key Laboratory of Quantum Information has perfected a 4-port, all-optically controlled non-reciprocal multifunctional photonic device based on a magnetic-field-free optomechanical resonator. [33] To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2392] viXra:1805.0198 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-09 05:27:08

Heavy Fermion Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

A 2017 theory proposed by Rice University physicists to explain the contradictory behavior of an iron-based high-temperature superconductor is helping solve a puzzle in a different type of unconventional superconductor, the "heavy fermion" compound known as CeCu2Si2. [18] Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. [17] The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2391] viXra:1805.0174 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-08 06:53:37

Inner Calm of Quantum Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and multi-institutional collaborators have been studying BACOVO—a one-dimensional quantum material. [12] While defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2390] viXra:1805.0171 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-08 07:57:57

Atom Clouds Challenges Theories

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Experiments with ultra-cold atoms at the TU Wien have shown surprising results: coupled atom clouds synchronize within milliseconds. This effect cannot be explained by standard theories. [38] Scientists forged quantum connections between separate regions within clouds of ultracold atoms, demonstrating entanglement between thousands of particles in two different locations. [37] Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2389] viXra:1805.0156 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-06 23:05:21

Quantum Local Causality in Non-Metric Space

Authors: fosco Ruzzene
Comments: 32 Pages.

Previous analysis of Bell inequalities identified the assumption of metric variables for physical quantities. Because of the nexus between variable-type and underlying geometry, and by implication space structure, inequalities violation can be attributed to space being non-metric. Analysis of Heisenberg gedanken experiments leads to the same possibility. The consensus view however, is that local causality is the sole assumption. An alternative analysis of the extended EPR perfect anti-correlation configuration finds that this is not correct. There is also the additional assumption of orientation independence.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2388] viXra:1805.0154 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-07 01:19:12

Smart Microchip

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

To address this technology gap, a team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed an innovative microchip, named BATLESS, that can continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. [32] Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery that could provide a cheap way to store wind or solar energy generated when the sun is shining and wind is blowing so it can be fed back into the electric grid and be redistributed when demand is high. [31] Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2387] viXra:1805.0148 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-07 09:27:43

Magnetized Plasmas

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

The new approach, known as a plasma q-plate, will revolutionize sources for generating optical vortices. The work will impact a broad range of applications. [30] A new material created by Oregon State University researchers is a key step toward the next generation of supercomputers. [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23] A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research. [22] In experiments at SLAC, intense laser light (red) shining through a magnesium oxide crystal excited the outermost " valence " electrons of oxygen atoms deep inside it. [21]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2386] viXra:1805.0114 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-05 03:47:51

Laser-Driven Electron Recollision

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin combined state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations to test a fundamental assumption underlying strong-field physics. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2385] viXra:1805.0093 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-04 06:20:10

Subtract a Single Quantum of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

In a collaboration between Aarhus University and the University of Southern Denmark, researchers have discovered a way to subtract a single quantum of light from a laser beam. [29] Researchers at the University of Washington, working with researchers from the ETH-Zurich, Purdue University and Virginia Commonwealth University, have achieved an optical communications breakthrough that could revolutionize information technology. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2384] viXra:1805.0092 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-04 06:54:18

High Entropy Superconductors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

The new material retains superconducting properties over a wider range of lattice parameters than materials without high-entropy alloy states. [34] Manipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. [33] University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have added a new dimension to our understanding of why straining a particular group of materials, called Ruddlesden-Popper oxides, tampers with their superconducting properties. [32] Nuclear techniques have played an important role in determining the crystal structure of a rare type of intermetallic alloy that exhibits superconductivity. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2383] viXra:1805.0091 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-04 07:46:38

Magnet-Free Optical Circulator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 50 Pages.

Researchers at AMOLF and the University of Texas have circumvented this problem with a vibrating glass ring that interacts with light. They thus created a microscale circulator that directionally routes light on an optical chip without using magnets. [30] Researchers have discovered three distinct variants of magnetic domain walls in the helimagnet iron germanium (FeGe). [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23] A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2382] viXra:1805.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-02 13:00:59

Quantum Engineering Revolution

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Already, the researchers have several experiments planned for the magnetic quantum Newton's cradle and they anticipate many more opportunities for building upon this work as the quantum revolution evolves. [29] Researchers at the University of Washington, working with researchers from the ETH-Zurich, Purdue University and Virginia Commonwealth University, have achieved an optical communications breakthrough that could revolutionize information technology. [28] A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2381] viXra:1805.0072 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-03 01:02:36

Photons: Explained and Derived by Energy Wave Equations

Authors: Jeff Yee
Comments: 22 pages

The photon is demystified in energy wave theory as a transverse wave packet of energy, resulting from the vibration of particles that are responding to waves that naturally travel the universe. In earlier works in the theory, the photon was accurately modeled mathematically with the same wave properties that govern the creation of particles and their forces. In this paper, the photon’s behavior is further explained to match various photon experiments, describing the mechanism for the creation and absorption of transverse waves.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2380] viXra:1805.0069 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-03 01:26:54

Quantum Spin Ice

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

Their goal is to create an observable case of quantum spin ice, a bizarre magnetic state found in a special class of materials that could lead to advances in quantum computing technologies. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2379] viXra:1805.0068 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-03 04:23:28

Space-Time as an Emergent Phenomena a Possible Way to Explain Entanglement and the Tunnel Effect

Authors: P. Castro, M. Gatta, J.R. Croca, R. Moreira
Comments: 11 Pages.

Entanglement and the tunnel effect phenomena have been repeatedly observed and are generically accepted under orthodox quantum mechanics formalism. However, they remain rather inexplicable, in the context of space-time usual conceptualization. In the present work, we suggest an alternative quantum mechanics formalism, refining the pilot-wave theory initially proposed by de Broglie. We suggest that space-time is an emergent phenomenon from a prior subquantum medium and that entanglement and the tunnel effect can be explained in terms of a nonlinear relation valid for subquantum waves.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2378] viXra:1805.0057 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-03 08:36:29

Reality from its Basics

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

Building a physics theory from the basics of physical reality is not a costly enterprise and can be realized with some determination. Finding the basic structure is essential. Quite peculiar enough, the discovery of that structure occurred long ago. Current physics does not yet exploit this knowledge.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2377] viXra:1805.0055 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-01 03:33:58

Laser the Future of Wi-Fi

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

Wi-Fi and cellular data traffic are increasing exponentially but, unless the capacity of wireless links can be increased, all that traffic is bound to lead to unacceptable bottlenecks. [12] While defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2376] viXra:1805.0054 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-01 04:06:07

Beyond Moore's Law

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 24 Pages.

Research appearing today in Nature Communications finds useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate "valleytronics" transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips. [13] Wi-Fi and cellular data traffic are increasing exponentially but, unless the capacity of wireless links can be increased, all that traffic is bound to lead to unacceptable bottlenecks. [12] While defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2375] viXra:1805.0052 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-01 05:24:02

Split Atom Clouds get Entangled

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Scientists forged quantum connections between separate regions within clouds of ultracold atoms, demonstrating entanglement between thousands of particles in two different locations. [37] Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2374] viXra:1805.0037 [pdf] submitted on 2018-05-02 04:37:14

Metamaterial Electromagnetic Effects

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 48 Pages.

Researchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. [29] Magnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices. [28] In a new study, researchers have designed "invisible" magnetic sensors—sensors that are magnetically invisible so that they can still detect but do not distort the surrounding magnetic fields. [27] At Carnegie Mellon University, Materials Science and Engineering Professor Mike McHenry and his research group are developing metal amorphous nanocomposite materials (MANC), or magnetic materials whose nanocrystals have been grown out of an amorphous matrix to create a two phase magnetic material that exploits both the attractive magnetic inductions of the nanocrystals and the large electrical resistance of a metallic glass. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23] A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research. [22] In experiments at SLAC, intense laser light (red) shining through a magnesium oxide crystal excited the outermost " valence " electrons of oxygen atoms deep inside it. [21]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2373] viXra:1804.0497 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 13:23:25

Electron Orbitals Manipulated in Diamonds

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 20 Pages.

While defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2372] viXra:1804.0493 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 17:39:51

Refutation of the Complementarity Inequality © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The modified Mach-Zehnder setup is tautologous. This confirms the findings of the Afshar experiment. The subsequent complementarity inequality is not tautologous, although the closest state of truthity (non-contingent). This violates and refutes the complementarity inequality, and confirms the original Afshar paper.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2371] viXra:1804.0480 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 06:34:44

Resolution of Microscopes

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Researchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russia) and Bangor University (UK) have experimentally verified anomalous amplitude apodization for non-spherical particles for the first time. This phenomenon makes it possible to boost the magnifying power of microscopes and to record molecules and viruses more effectively. [25] With a thin probe and a burst of microwaves, doctors can eradicate cancer cells without opening up a patient for surgery. [24] A new source of intense terahertz (THz) radiation, which could offer a less harmful alternative to X-rays and has strong potential for use in industry, is being developed by scientists at the University of Strathclyde and Capital Normal University in Beijing. [23] Biomedical engineers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a new technique for measuring blood flow in the human brain, which could be used in patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury, for example. [22] According to a new study in Cell, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatments. [21] The possibility of cognitive nuclear-spin processing came to Fisher in part through studies performed in the 1980s that reported a remarkable lithium isotope dependence on the behavior of mother rats. [20] And as will be presented today at the 25th annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS), cognitive neuroscientists increasingly are using those emerging artificial networks to enhance their understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. [19] U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization. [18] have come up with a novel machine learning method that enables scientists to derive insights from systems of previously intractable complexity in record time. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2370] viXra:1804.0479 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 07:22:39

De Werkelijkheid Vanuit Zijn Grondbeginselen

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. d

Het opbouwen van een natuurkundige theorie vanuit de grondbeginselen van de fysieke werkelijkheid is geen kostbare onderneming en kan met wat doorzettingsvermogen gerealiseerd worden. Het vinden van de basisstructuur is daarbij van wezenlijk belang. De ontdekking van die structuur heeft merkwaardig genoeg al lang geleden plaats gehad. De huidige natuurkunde maakt nog geen gebruik van deze kennis.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2369] viXra:1804.0477 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 09:02:57

Positron Luminescence

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 41 Pages.

Now in a new study, researchers have found that a beam of positrons (positively charged anti-electrons) incident on a phosphor screen produces significantly more luminescence than an electron beam does. [26] Researchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russia) and Bangor University (UK) have experimentally verified anomalous amplitude apodization for non-spherical particles for the first time. This phenomenon makes it possible to boost the magnifying power of microscopes and to record molecules and viruses more effectively. [25] With a thin probe and a burst of microwaves, doctors can eradicate cancer cells without opening up a patient for surgery. [24] A new source of intense terahertz (THz) radiation, which could offer a less harmful alternative to X-rays and has strong potential for use in industry, is being developed by scientists at the University of Strathclyde and Capital Normal University in Beijing. [23] Biomedical engineers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a new technique for measuring blood flow in the human brain, which could be used in patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury, for example. [22] According to a new study in Cell, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatments. [21] The possibility of cognitive nuclear-spin processing came to Fisher in part through studies performed in the 1980s that reported a remarkable lithium isotope dependence on the behavior of mother rats. [20] And as will be presented today at the 25th annual meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS), cognitive neuroscientists increasingly are using those emerging artificial networks to enhance their understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. [19] U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientists have discovered a way to leverage emerging brain-like computer architectures for an age-old number-theoretic problem known as integer factorization. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2368] viXra:1804.0476 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-30 10:25:40

Vibrations in Superconducting Crystals

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Manipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. [33] University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have added a new dimension to our understanding of why straining a particular group of materials, called Ruddlesden-Popper oxides, tampers with their superconducting properties. [32] Nuclear techniques have played an important role in determining the crystal structure of a rare type of intermetallic alloy that exhibits superconductivity. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2367] viXra:1804.0473 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-28 14:42:54

Lorentz Transformation @ (2pi)^0.5

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 3 Pages.

Lorentz Transformation @ (2pi)^0.5 Fine Structure Constant @ (2pi)^0.5 Time Dilation KronosPrime@outlook.com
Category: Quantum Physics

[2366] viXra:1804.0419 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-28 12:06:56

Terahertz Semiconductor Laser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

The ability to harness light into an intense beam of monochromatic radiation in a laser has revolutionized the way we live and work for more than fifty years. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2365] viXra:1804.0417 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-27 18:13:47

Refutation of Quantum Arithmetic Using Repeat-Until-Success Circuits © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The use of quantum arithmetic using repeat-until-success circuits is not tautologous and hence refuted. We abandoned further analysis of this Microsoft opus.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2364] viXra:1804.0414 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-27 20:59:17

An Awaited Formula for the Planck Constant

Authors: Leonardo Rubino
Comments: 1 Page.

An awaited formula for the Planck Constant and the awaited link with the other universal constants.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2363] viXra:1804.0413 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-28 01:58:32

Is it Necessary the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics?

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 8 Pages. Язык: русский

Any interpretation, being a translation from one language (for example, micro-) to another language (for example, macro-), "rests" in the unproven possibility of the same conclusionbility or expressiveness in describing phenomena of different levels of ontology. In this sense, any interpretation is inherently speculative. There is the language of the theory - and we should communicate by it. In addition, there is a meta-language of philosophical generalizations.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2362] viXra:1804.0401 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-26 23:49:54

The Shadow of the Smile of the "Cheshire Cat"

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 13 Pages. Язык: русский

Offers a discussion of some topological paradoxes arising in the theory of relativity.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2361] viXra:1804.0400 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-26 23:55:31

PMC-topology

Authors: V.A.Kasimov
Comments: 2 Pages. Язык: русский

In the mathematical description of physical phenomena is used mainly Point-Metric Classical topology (PMC-topology), embodied in the methods of mathematical analysis. It is necessary to note the important features of the application of PMC-topology to the solution of the problems of space-time relations, which will give us an unambiguous hint at the limitations of its applicability. To understand the reason for this limitation, it is necessary to return to the origins of the continuity concept of point-metric classical topology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2360] viXra:1804.0396 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-27 05:40:17

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 74 Pages.

Physicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. [43] Researchers at Aalto University, Finland, have created a Bose-Einstein condensate of light coupled with metal electrons, so-called surface plasmon polaritons. [42] A team led by Rice University scientists used a unique combination of techniques to observe, for the first time, a condensed matter phenomenon about which others have only speculated. The research could aid in the development of quantum computers. [41] A half-century ago, the theorist Walter Henneberger wondered if it were possible to use a laser field to free an electron from its atom without removing it from the nucleus. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2359] viXra:1804.0391 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 13:04:25

Quantum Network

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

In recent years, nanofabricated mechanical oscillators have emerged as a promising platform for quantum information applications. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2358] viXra:1804.0389 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 13:23:20

Near-Macroscopic Entanglement

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 18 Pages.

In work recently published in Nature, a team led by Prof. Mika Sillanpää at Aalto University in Finland has shown that entanglement of massive objects can be generated and detected. [11] Bose, Marletto and their colleagues believe their proposals constitute an improvement on Feynman's idea. They are based on testing whether the mass could be entangled with a second identical mass via the gravitational field. [10] THREE WEEKS AGO, upon sifting through the aftermath of their protonsmashing experiments, physicists working at the Large Hadron Collider reported an unusual bump in their signal: the signature of two photons simultaneously hitting a detector. Physicists identify particles by reading these signatures, which result from the decay of larger, unstable particles that form during high-energy collisions. It's how they discovered the Higgs boson back in 2012. But this time, they had no idea where the photons came from. [9] In 2012, a proposed observation of the Higgs boson was reported at the Large Hadron Collider in CERN. The observation has puzzled the physics community, as the mass of the observed particle, 125 GeV, looks lighter than the expected energy scale, about 1 TeV. [8] 'In the new run, because of the highest-ever energies available at the LHC, we might finally create dark matter in the laboratory,' says Daniela. 'If dark matter is the lightest SUSY particle than we might discover many other SUSY particles, since SUSY predicts that every Standard Model particle has a SUSY counterpart.' [7] The problem is that there are several things the Standard Model is unable to explain, for example the dark matter that makes up a large part of the universe. Many particle physicists are therefore working on the development of new, more comprehensive models. [6] They might seem quite different, but both the Higgs boson and dark matter particles may have some similarities. The Higgs boson is thought to be the particle that gives matter its mass. And in the same vein, dark matter is thought to account for much of the 'missing mass' in galaxies in the universe. It may be that these mass-giving particles have more in common than was thought. [5] The magnetic induction creates a negative electric field, causing an electromagnetic inertia responsible for the relativistic mass change; it is the mysterious Higgs Field giving mass to the particles. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate by the diffraction patterns. The accelerating charges explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Relativistic Quantum Theories. The self maintained electric potential of the accelerating charges equivalent with the General Relativity space-time curvature, and since it is true on the quantum level also, gives the base of the Quantum Gravity.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2357] viXra:1804.0388 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 14:18:07

Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen (Epr) as not a Paradox But a Weakened Theorem © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The binary equation as rendered is tautologous. This confirms a modified thesis of the captioned paper, that EPR is not a paradox and is resolved as an implication theorem.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2356] viXra:1804.0387 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 18:29:30

Refutation of Quantum Block Chain Encoding © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The published equation as rendered is not tautologous. This means the attempt to convert classical information to quantum states is ultimately mistaken as a basis for quantum blockchain.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2355] viXra:1804.0384 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 22:40:05

Volume as Time Dimension

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 7 Pages.

Volume as Time Dimension Extracted form Volume of Schwarzschild radius of hbar ((hbar/s/c^2)*2*G/c^2) = 1.74266836e-78 meters = Schwarzschild radius of hbar KronosPrime@Outlook.com
Category: Quantum Physics

[2354] viXra:1804.0381 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-26 03:04:34

Once More About Quantum "Entanglement"

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 15 Pages. Язык: русский

During the conceptual design of the experimental results of Aspect one must speak the language of quantum mechanics, not the language of the Argo private insights. One of these insights is the concept of "entanglement" (of particles or states is unclear!) The same language of quantum mechanics allows for a clear and unambiguous manner to give concrete content to the questions on this occasion. For the analysis of the proposed elementary model used in [1, 2].
Category: Quantum Physics

[2353] viXra:1804.0380 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-26 03:07:59

The One-Particle Contextuality, Two-Particle Nonlocality, Entanglement, Wheeler's Experiments with Delayed Choice, FWT and All that ...

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 4 Pages. Язык: русский

In continuation of the discussion of the results of the Aspect's experiments [13]. An overview of the new results.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2352] viXra:1804.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-26 03:37:30

Modularity in the Universe

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

All massive objects in the universe behave as modules. All modules are recurrently regenerated by private stochastic processes. These processes install the coherence of the module and control the binding of components in composed modules.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2351] viXra:1804.0368 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-24 13:32:19

What Does the Rydberg Constant Represent ?

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 11 Pages.

Planck Units (kilograms & Joules) Treated as (Volume Units) of Planck Pressure KronosPrime@Outlook.com
Category: Quantum Physics

[2350] viXra:1804.0359 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 02:34:19

On the Time Reversal Noninvariance in Quantum Physics

Authors: V.A. Kuz`menko
Comments: 25 Pages.

A brief review of the main direct and indirect experimental proofs of the nonequivalence of forward and reversed processes in nonlinear optics is presented. The main consequences of this nonequivalence and the ways of its experimental study are discussed.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2349] viXra:1804.0358 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 02:58:28

Plastic Semiconductors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo. [42] Using short laser pulses, a research team led by Misha Ivanov of the Max Born Institute in Berlin, together with scientists from the Russian Quantum Center in Moscow, has shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within these novel materials. [41] Trapping light with an optical version of a whispering gallery, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a nanoscale coating for solar cells that enables them to absorb about 20 percent more sunlight than uncoated devices. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2348] viXra:1804.0356 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 06:03:20

About the EPR Paradox. Resolution Features

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 7 Pages. Язык: русский

In interpreting the results of experiments A. Aspect faced two concepts of quantum mechanics and relativity theory, which requires a thorough consideration of the causes of contradictions. The analysis of these issues devoted many works of different authors, and the points raised here also have been exhibited for analysis. However, we feel that contact again to the key moments of the contradiction and possibly in compressed form is a must.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2347] viXra:1804.0353 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 07:44:38

Quantum Dot Photon Detection

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

A team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2346] viXra:1804.0352 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-25 08:55:27

Quantum Blockchain

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

A pair of researchers with Victoria University of Wellington has suggested that the way to prevent future blockchains from future hackers using quantum computers is to use quantum blockchains. [27] Yale's latest work expanding the reach of quantum information science is actually a game of quantum pitch and catch. [26] With novel optoelectronic chips and a new partnership with a top silicon-chip manufacturer, MIT spinout Ayar Labs aims to increase speed and reduce energy consumption in computing, starting with data centers. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2345] viXra:1804.0348 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-23 10:52:44

Transition States of Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

An international group of physicists managed for the first time to experimentally observe the transition between two states of matter, propagating polariton-solitons and a Bose-Einstein condensate. [32] An international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from polaritons, hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2344] viXra:1804.0347 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-23 11:52:43

Quantum Cath in New Research

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Yale's latest work expanding the reach of quantum information science is actually a game of quantum pitch and catch. [26] With novel optoelectronic chips and a new partnership with a top silicon-chip manufacturer, MIT spinout Ayar Labs aims to increase speed and reduce energy consumption in computing, starting with data centers. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2343] viXra:1804.0343 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-23 13:10:26

Photons Shot from Non Inertial Frame of Reference

Authors: Adham Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed
Comments: 1 Page.

this describes why a photon shot from any side of the star would make the star make the star decrease its speed
Category: Quantum Physics

[2342] viXra:1804.0335 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-24 00:43:20

Spatially Separated EPR State

Authors: Masataka Ohta
Comments: 1 Page.

Usual arguments on EPR state assume that, after particles I and II interact somewhere, they are spatially separated, which is why EPR correlation was considered to be a paradox. That is, after the interaction, particle I exists only in a spatial region A, while particle II exists only in a spatial region B located at a distance from A. However, though the separation imposes certain restriction on possible quantum state, its implication has not been properly considered. That is, though quantum state of A is a tensor product of quantum state of particle I and II in A, as quantum state of particle II in A is ground state only, the product is identical to quantum state of particle I in A. Similarly, quantum state of B is quantum state of particle II in B. Then, as entire quantum state is Cartesian, not tensor, product of quantum state of A and B, the entire quantum state is Cartesian product of quantum state of particle I and II, which means there is no tensor product term to represent quantum entanglement. For example, using binary state, (|0>, |0>) + (|1>, |1>) = (|0>, |1>) + (|1>, |0>) = (|0> + |1>, |0> + |1>). Separation process resolves entanglement. If the entire quantum state is calculated differently, by first taking Cartesian product and, then, tensor product, a tensor product term appears. However, as the term represents action at a distance and, thus, unphysical, its coefficient must always be 0. That is, quantum entanglement of EPR correlation assuming the spatial separation is a superficial mathematical artifact representing action at a distance.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2341] viXra:1804.0329 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-24 08:48:29

Experimental Metaphysics

Authors: A.V. Kaminsky
Comments: 21 Pages.

Quantum mechanics today allows you to experimentally test the basic philosophical paradigms. The article describes experiments with entangled states, the interpretation of which affects the conceptual questions of philosophy.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2340] viXra:1804.0327 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-24 09:37:25

Electrogates in Microfluids

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

The researchers, Y. Arango, Y. Temiz, O. Gӧkçe, and E. Delamarche, at IBM Research-Zurich in Rüschlikon, Switzerland, have published a paper on electrogates in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters. [42] Using short laser pulses, a research team led by Misha Ivanov of the Max Born Institute in Berlin, together with scientists from the Russian Quantum Center in Moscow, has shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within these novel materials. [41] Trapping light with an optical version of a whispering gallery, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a nanoscale coating for solar cells that enables them to absorb about 20 percent more sunlight than uncoated devices. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2339] viXra:1804.0325 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-24 10:43:30

Cooler Superconductors

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have added a new dimension to our understanding of why straining a particular group of materials, called Ruddlesden-Popper oxides, tampers with their superconducting properties. [32] Nuclear techniques have played an important role in determining the crystal structure of a rare type of intermetallic alloy that exhibits superconductivity. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2338] viXra:1804.0323 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-23 05:43:00

Dissipation Curve of Topological Insulator

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

In view of these properties, it is hoped that topological insulators can be used in advanced communications and information processing systems, as well as in quantum computing. [34] For the first time, a group of researchers from Universidad Complutense de Madrid, IBM, ETH Zurich, MIT and Harvard University have observed topological phases of matter of quantum states under the action of temperature or certain types of experimental imperfections. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2337] viXra:1804.0317 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-22 13:46:56

MBNM (Measuringbynotmeasuring) Thought Experiment

Authors: Chakarapani N Rao
Comments: 2 Pages.

Here's a thought experiment. If we can contain an electron within a resting sphere of diameter 1m, without the electron coming in contact with the walls of the sphere for 48min, Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle becomes epistemological not ontological.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2336] viXra:1804.0314 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-22 16:24:29

What Does Rydberg Constant Represent?

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 10 Pages. Rydberg is Planck Mass

What does Rydberg constant represent?
Category: Quantum Physics

[2335] viXra:1804.0313 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-22 17:01:20

Simultaneous Measurement of Wave and Particle Properties Using Modified Young's Double-Slit Experiment

Authors: Kazufumi Sakai
Comments: 5 Pages. Science Front Publishers, Journal for Foundations and Applications of Physics, vol. 5, No. 2 (2018), ISSN 2394-3688

The principle of complementarity is the foundation of quantum mechanics; its correctness has been verified by several studies. At present, the Englert – Greenberger duality relation is used for quantitative evaluations. We fabricated a new double slit experimental apparatus capable of simultaneously measuring the visibility and path-distinguishability, and measured the wave and particle properties. We thus obtained results in disagreement with the principle of complementarity.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2334] viXra:1804.0312 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-23 01:37:41

Some Topological Paradoxes of Relativity (Epr)-II

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 6 Pages. Язык: русский

To refer again to the article A. Aspect "bell's THEOREM: the naive view of the experimenter" we were forced by some publications. However, we have again seen the conceptual correctness of the statement of the problem of EPR in the Aspect's article. In conceptual terms, in the "naive presentation of EPR" from the Aspect of no "splices" probabilistic measures of different spaces is not required. The presentation of the Aspect is logically closed and complete. The existence of a problem related to the violation of bell inequality is shown conceptually (by simple examples). The real possibility of solving this problem today is, in our opinion, only a relational interpretation of quantum mechanics [3], [4], since the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics Rovelli "puts out the brackets" local causality in the EPR paradox, replacing it with the concept of the integrity of the relations of the observed systems and, thereby, abandoning the concept of velocity, doubtful from the point of view of quantum mechanics as a derivative in the TMK-topology of space-time relations. And this is, apparently, what physics is "pregnant" for a long time! But the difficulty of resolution of the dilemma of completeness and the local causality associated with the absence of the notion of speed in the form of spatio-temporal derivative in the scalar form. And this is a common problem of quantum mechanics, which the relational concept intends to solve . In the proposed article there are all logical "ties", for each of which it would be possible to object and say - it is not so
Category: Quantum Physics

[2333] viXra:1804.0302 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-22 04:31:53

Explanation of Quantum Entanglement Using Hidden Variables

Authors: Jesús Sánchez
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this paper, it will be explained the quantum entanglement using hidden variables. This means, with no need of immediate or infinity range interactions. For this, the solution would be to take into account also the measurement device hidden variables. These hidden variables of the measurement device will cause that the detection of the particles to be measured, can only be made at certain moments, places and orientations that correspond when the particle states have specific values. This means, the particle state can be changing over time, but the measurement equipment can only detect it when it has certain values (because the hidden values of the measurement equipment are also participating in the process). So, the measurement device is participating indirectly in the entanglement of the particles. The problem until now with hidden variables interpretation was that only the hidden variables of the particles were taken into account. But, once the measurement device hidden variables status is considered also, the issue can be solved.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2332] viXra:1804.0300 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-22 08:16:50

Some Topological Paradoxes of Relativity (Epr)

Authors: V.A. Kasimov
Comments: 16 Pages. Язык: русский

In the footsteps of the article by A. Aspect "BELL'S THEOREM: the naive view of an experimentalist". Because in equation (23) has detected an error (or typo), I took the trouble to verify calculations from 1 to 5 sections of the article. The are some clarifying points that are important for understanding the essence. Given an elementary conclusion of formulas (3) that is omitted in the article. The Bell's inequality, derived on the basis of the general model for a dichotomous variable, disturbed the quantum mechanical model for a pair of "entangled" photons. In Bell's article it is clearly (though not very detailed) shown. No " artificial gadgets" is not able to resolve this contradiction. The only thing that causes confusion is the procedure of creating a mixed state of two photons and the essence conceptual view of mathematics experiment. Theoretically, this procedure can be represented as a symmetrization of the wave function of the pair. However, how does the transfer of this idea to the technical essence of the experiment is unclear.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2331] viXra:1804.0296 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-20 14:17:20

Rydberg Electron v2.0

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 6 Pages. It is Accurate

Phi Based Fractal Universe
Category: Quantum Physics

[2330] viXra:1804.0294 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-20 15:23:06

Ultrafast Electron Oscillation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Collaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) have reported petahertz electron oscillation. [38] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2329] viXra:1804.0286 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-21 01:49:59

Volume of the Electron = Photon ev

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 8 Pages. Bulk Modulus & Wave Speed of Aether Medium derived from Electron Schwarzschild radius

Bulk Modulus & Wave Speed of Aether Medium derived from Electron Schwarzschild radius
Category: Quantum Physics

[2328] viXra:1804.0285 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-21 03:39:44

The Emergence of Spatio-Temporal Certainty (1+2+3)

Authors: V. A. Kasimov.
Comments: 28 Pages. Язык: русский

The well - known philosophical formula: "Space and time are universal forms of existence of matter" forces us to introduce several levels of representation of our knowledge about space-time relations, which we will conditionally call "levels of ontologization" of our understanding of these relations. These levels can be considered as ontological sections in the process of cognition of the essence of spatiotemporal relations and the formation of their conceptual certainty. A simple example is used to model the process of formation of spatiotemporal certainty in the Leibniz aspect: the transition from the quantum level (micro) to the level of classical mechanics (macro). In this regard, we can talk about the two-phase existence of matter. In addition, an attempt was made to outline the solution of space-time problems after work: "Contextuality of one particle, nonlocality of two particles, entanglement, Wheeler's experiments with delay of choice, FWT and so on ..."[12]. The current situation of the search for the essence of space-time relations resembles the early history of the search for the essence of "phlogiston", which was resolved by the statistical theory of Gibbs ensembles, the definition of thermodynamic concepts and, in particular, the concept of temperature as the average kinetic energy of the ensemble. It is quite possible that the spatiotemporal relations are also some averages from the eigenvalues of the quantum object operators.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2327] viXra:1804.0283 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-19 08:00:16

Laser Control of Magnets

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia have found a way to write and delete magnets in an alloy using a laser beam, a surprising effect. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2326] viXra:1804.0282 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-19 09:43:35

Wireless Power Transfer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

An international research team including scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and ITMO University has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. [40] Collaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) have reported petahertz electron oscillation. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2325] viXra:1804.0276 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-19 14:17:24

Universe in Microcosm

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Researchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. [9] Gravitational waves may be produced in the heart of the galaxy, says a new study led by Ph.D. student Joseph Fernandez at Liverpool John Moores University. [8] Using data from the first-ever gravitational waves detected last year, along with a theoretical analysis, physicists have shown that gravitational waves may oscillate between two different forms called "g" and "f"-type gravitational waves. [7] Astronomy experiments could soon test an idea developed by Albert Einstein almost exactly a century ago, scientists say. [6] It's estimated that 27% of all the matter in the universe is invisible, while everything from PB&J sandwiches to quasars accounts for just 4.9%. But a new theory of gravity proposed by theoretical physicist Erik Verlinde of the University of Amsterdam found out a way to dispense with the pesky stuff. [5] The proposal by the trio though phrased in a way as to suggest it's a solution to the arrow of time problem, is not likely to be addressed as such by the physics community— it's more likely to be considered as yet another theory that works mathematically, yet still can't answer the basic question of what is time. [4] The Weak Interaction transforms an electric charge in the diffraction pattern from one side to the other side, causing an electric dipole momentum change, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The Neutrino Oscillation of the Weak Interaction shows that it is a General electric dipole change and it is possible to any other temperature dependent entropy and information changing diffraction pattern of atoms, molecules and even complicated biological living structures.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2324] viXra:1804.0274 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-19 14:56:03

Rydberg Electron

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 3 Pages. GUT

Universe is Entirely a Fractal Set based off Rydberg
Category: Quantum Physics

[2323] viXra:1804.0252 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-17 19:18:22

Refutation of GHZ Experiments © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The expected result for GHZ is supposed to be a contradiction. However the result is not a contradiction, due to one contingency value (falsity) as not contradictory. This means the GHZ experiment is refuted, further supporting previous refutations of Bell's inequality using Meth8/VŁ4.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2322] viXra:1804.0248 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-18 05:09:59

Hybrid Quantum Systems

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 29 Pages.

A team of researchers from the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo and NTT Basic Research Laboratories (BRL, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation) in Japan have published an explanation of how quantum systems may be able to heat up by cooling down. [19] Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created a chip on which laser light interacts with a tiny cloud of atoms to serve as a miniature toolkit for measuring. [18] An international collaboration, including researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Royal Holloway, University of London, has successfully demonstrated a quantum coherent effect in a new quantum device made out of continuous superconducting wire – the Charge Quantum Interference Device (CQUID). [17] The groundbreaking result sheds light on an elusive phenomenon whose existence, a natural outcome of the hundred-year-old theory of superconductivity, has long been speculated, but never actually observed. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2321] viXra:1804.0247 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-18 05:38:11

Topological Quantum Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

For the first time, a group of researchers from Universidad Complutense de Madrid, IBM, ETH Zurich, MIT and Harvard University have observed topological phases of matter of quantum states under the action of temperature or certain types of experimental imperfections. [33] With their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. [32] A team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing. [27] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2320] viXra:1804.0246 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-18 06:46:57

Nuclear Techniques of Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Nuclear techniques have played an important role in determining the crystal structure of a rare type of intermetallic alloy that exhibits superconductivity. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2319] viXra:1804.0227 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-16 05:14:31

Spin-3/2 Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2318] viXra:1804.0226 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-16 06:51:43

Quantum Entanglement Record

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 72 Pages.

A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. [43] Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2317] viXra:1804.0221 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-16 10:48:57

Electron in a Dual State

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

A half-century ago, the theorist Walter Henneberger wondered if it were possible to use a laser field to free an electron from its atom without removing it from the nucleus. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2316] viXra:1804.0220 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-16 11:07:43

Superconductive Current of Spin

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 26 Pages.

Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. [17] The first known superconductor in which spin-3/2 quasiparticles form Cooper pairs has been created by physicists in the US and New Zealand. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2315] viXra:1804.0212 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-17 01:30:45

Quantum Shift in Light and Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

A team led by Rice University scientists used a unique combination of techniques to observe, for the first time, a condensed matter phenomenon about which others have only speculated. The research could aid in the development of quantum computers. [41] A half-century ago, the theorist Walter Henneberger wondered if it were possible to use a laser field to free an electron from its atom without removing it from the nucleus. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2314] viXra:1804.0208 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-17 05:29:22

New Bose-Einstein Condensate

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 73 Pages.

Researchers at Aalto University, Finland, have created a Bose-Einstein condensate of light coupled with metal electrons, so-called surface plasmon polaritons. [42] A team led by Rice University scientists used a unique combination of techniques to observe, for the first time, a condensed matter phenomenon about which others have only speculated. The research could aid in the development of quantum computers. [41] A half-century ago, the theorist Walter Henneberger wondered if it were possible to use a laser field to free an electron from its atom without removing it from the nucleus. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2313] viXra:1804.0196 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-14 09:25:33

Understanding Random Pixels & Random Numbers in the Context of SEM/TEM/AFM/cryo-Electron Microscopy Image Processing – A Promising Technical Insight into the Interesting World of Randomness & Noisy Images in EM Domains Using a Quantum Device & Image J

Authors: Nirmal Tej kumar
Comments: 3 Pages. Technical Communication on Quantum Computing & Concepts

A sincere attempt is made to probe EM domains using Randomness & Random Numbers by using a Quantum Device as stated in the above mentioned TITLE of this technical communication.To the best of our knowledge this is indeed a pioneering R&D technical note using a Quantum Device.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2312] viXra:1804.0194 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-14 13:23:50

The Holomorphic Quanta. A Relational Model for Visualizing, Understanding and Teaching Quantum Physics and Relativity

Authors: Theodore J. St. John
Comments: 14 Pages.

Quantum Mechanics is appropriately named because it is mostly about the mechanics used to work probability problems. There must be, and there is a better way to visualize the concepts of quantum physics so that teachers can present a consistent conceptual interpretation. In this paper, we use a graph (i.e. the image of a graphical map) to represent the relationships between space, time and motion but we interpose the linear space-time domain (the moving or relativistic reference frame in the region greater than one) with a logarithmic spatial-temporal frequency domain (the at-rest or quantum reference frame in the region between zero and one). This approach demonstrates space-time equivalence as S=Tc^2, and thereby reveals the de Broglie equations for energy of a quantum particle in exactly the same geometric relation as the total energy relations that include mass-energy equivalence. The model allows one to visualize the particle-wave duality as a change in perspective the same as you can visualize an object both at rest with respect to your classroom yet in motion with respect to the sun, provides a perspective on the meaning of time and the psychological time flux as an eternal process of transformation, reinterprets the speed of light as the speed at which darkness (the absence of information) recedes, and concludes that the solid objects that occupy 3-dimensional expanse of space can be viewed as holomorphic images, materialized by the interaction of fields that gain physical form by their transformation into divergence and curl.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2311] viXra:1804.0186 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-13 08:39:13

Fine-Structure on Dark Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

A team of researchers from the University of California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has conducted an ultra-precise measurement of the fine-structure constant, and in so doing, have found evidence that casts doubts on dark photon theory. [32] Thanks to low-noise superconducting quantum amplifiers invented at the University of California, Berkeley, physicists are now embarking on the most sensitive search yet for axions, one of today's top candidates for dark matter. [31] The Axion Dark Matter Experiment (ADMX) at the University of Washington in Seattle has finally reached the sensitivity needed to detect axions if they make up dark matter, physicists report today in Physical Review Letters. [30] Now our new study – which hints that extremely light particles called neutrinos are likely to make up some of the dark matter – challenges our current understanding of its composition. [29] A new particle detector design proposed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could greatly broaden the search for dark matter—which makes up 85 percent of the total mass of the universe yet we don't know what it's made of—into an unexplored realm. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2310] viXra:1804.0184 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-13 09:00:32

Dipolar Molecule

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 69 Pages.

Harvard Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Kang-Kuen Ni and colleagues have combined two atoms for the first time into what researchers call a dipolar molecule. [40] A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2309] viXra:1804.0181 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-13 23:39:36

Why Imaginary Quaternions Bear no Nexus to Reality © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The quaternion of Hamilton is not tautologous.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2308] viXra:1804.0180 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-13 05:42:10

Quantum Supremacy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 70 Pages.

Neill is lead author of the group's new paper, "A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubits," now published in the journal Science. [42] Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2307] viXra:1804.0167 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-12 08:27:27

Prototype of Advanced Quantum Memory

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Employees of Kazan Federal University and Kazan Quantum Center of Kazan National Research Technical University demonstrated an original layout of a prototype of multiresonator broadband quantum-memory interface. [27] New nanoparticle-based films that are more than 80 times thinner than a human hair may help to fill this need by providing materials that can holographically archive more than 1000 times more data than a DVD in a 10-by-10-centimeter piece of film. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2306] viXra:1804.0163 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-12 11:07:42

Photon eV = Charge Area V2.0

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 5 Pages. It is Accurate

Universe is a Fractal Aether of Primes using a Fibonacci Geometry
Category: Quantum Physics

[2305] viXra:1804.0157 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-11 22:14:27

Charge Area of the Electron = Photon ev

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 4 Pages. Charge Area of the electron = photon eV

Charge Area of the electron = photon eV (((((1.352910249E-57 m)^2) / ((1.6161132e-35 m)^2)) / 13) * (((2 * 5)^2) s)) / ((1.6161132e-35 m) / c) = 0.999999981 1 / ((((((1.352910249E-57 m) / hbar) / c) / electron mass) / 2)^0.5) = 6.5248935 m kg / s 1.352910249E-57 m (2 * electron mass * G) / (c^2) = 1.35291025e-57 m (6.6774545e-11 m^3/kg/s^2)/c^2/ (6.52485 kg m/s)/electron mass/5^3 = 1 ((((6.6774545e-11 * (((1/5) m)^3)) / (kg / (s^2))) / (c^2)) / (6.52485 ((kg m) / s))) / (electron mass / (kg^3)) = 0.999999994 s5 1.6161132e-35 (meters / planck length) = 0.9999287396 https://photos.app.goo.gl/hwS73Pg69x76Y5v42 Photon transit channel = https://photos.app.goo.gl/C49aNNCBAEHYd2Ng1 Photon transit channel = 1/((x)^(7)*(y)^(7))^(1/6) http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=1%2F((x)%5E(7)*(y)%5E(7))%5E(1%2F6) KronosPrime@ outlook.com https://sites.google.com/site/fractalprimeuniverse/electron-charge-area
Category: Quantum Physics

[2304] viXra:1804.0151 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-09 07:57:22

Quantum Mechanics & Quantum Signal Processing Framework Based Cryo-EM Image Processing Using Higher Order Logic(HOL)/Haskell/Scala/JikesRVM/IoT Environment - An Innovative & Interesting Approach in the Context of Quantum Computing.

Authors: Nirmal Tej kumar
Comments: 5 Pages. Technical Communication on Quantum Computing & Concepts

“Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it.” - Niels Bohr. As we all know,cryo-EM Image Processing is proving itself as a useful tool.In this context,we came across interesting and inspirational research papers titled - Quantum approach to Image processing by Mohammad Rastegari and Quantum image processing? by Mario Mastriani.In general,this approach could be applied to any Electron Microscopy Domain/s – SEM/TEM/AFM etc...
Category: Quantum Physics

[2303] viXra:1804.0150 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-09 11:05:48

Using Two Quantum Channels

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 52 Pages.

Physicists have demonstrated that using two quantum channels in different orders can enhance a communication network's ability to transmit information—even, counterintuitively, when the channels are identical. [32] In a new paper, however, physicists Flavio Del Santo at the University of Vienna and Borivoje Dakić at the Austrian Academy of Sciences have shown that, in the quantum world, information can travel in both directions simultaneously—a feature that is forbidden by the laws of classical physics. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2302] viXra:1804.0148 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-09 12:34:06

Coincidence and Non-coincidence Using Optical Circulators

Authors: M. W. Roberts
Comments: 11 Pages.

An optical experiment is described in which pairs of quantum entangled photons are sent into separate optical circulators. Theoretical analysis is used to predict the number of coincident detections between these photons at the output from the circulators. With proper control of non-local, two-photon interference, the photon pairs can be put in perfect coincidence or in perfect non-coincidence, as selected by the experimenter. These results contradict the predictions made using classical probability analysis.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2301] viXra:1804.0145 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-09 22:47:36

Fractal Prime Universe 5.0

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 11 Pages. (2/3^2 /5^2 * 11 *137.035999172^2) = 1836.15569564

Fibonacci Fractal Prime Universe (2/3^2 /5^2 * 11 *137.035999172^2) = 1836.15569564 (2/3^2 /5^2 * 11 *137^2) = 1835.19111111 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton-to-electron_mass_ratio https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-structure_constant
Category: Quantum Physics

[2300] viXra:1804.0144 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-09 22:59:37

Fibonacci Luminiferous Aether MATRIX

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 1 Page. (2/3^2 /5^2 * 11 *137.035999172^2) = 1836.15569564224205814599

Fibonacci Luminiferous Aether MATRIX (2/3^2 /5^2 * 11 *137.035999172^2) = 1836.15569564224205814599 Fibonacci (2*5)D https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton-to-electron_mass_ratio https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fine-structure_constant
Category: Quantum Physics

[2299] viXra:1804.0134 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-10 09:25:45

Quantum Junction

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

The groundbreaking result sheds light on an elusive phenomenon whose existence, a natural outcome of the hundred-year-old theory of superconductivity, has long been speculated, but never actually observed. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2298] viXra:1804.0133 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-10 10:11:06

Polarization Impact on Electrons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

A new study by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) may explain this disparity. In the work, the OIST researchers measured electrical current across a two-dimensional plane. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2297] viXra:1804.0131 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-10 12:53:37

Charge Quantum Interference Device

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 26 Pages.

An international collaboration, including researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Royal Holloway, University of London, has successfully demonstrated a quantum coherent effect in a new quantum device made out of continuous superconducting wire – the Charge Quantum Interference Device (CQUID). [17] The groundbreaking result sheds light on an elusive phenomenon whose existence, a natural outcome of the hundred-year-old theory of superconductivity, has long been speculated, but never actually observed. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2296] viXra:1804.0128 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-11 02:14:46

The Photoelectric Effect

Authors: Emil Gigov
Comments: 1 Page.

The laws of the photoelectric effect were discovered by Stoletov and Lenard. And not everything is known yet in that area.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2295] viXra:1804.0127 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-11 03:33:03

Length with Quantum Precision

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 28 Pages.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created a chip on which laser light interacts with a tiny cloud of atoms to serve as a miniature toolkit for measuring. [18] An international collaboration, including researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Royal Holloway, University of London, has successfully demonstrated a quantum coherent effect in a new quantum device made out of continuous superconducting wire – the Charge Quantum Interference Device (CQUID). [17] The groundbreaking result sheds light on an elusive phenomenon whose existence, a natural outcome of the hundred-year-old theory of superconductivity, has long been speculated, but never actually observed. [16] Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2294] viXra:1804.0123 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-11 06:36:53

Resolving the EPR Paradox and Bell's Theorem

Authors: Robert H. McEachern
Comments: 2 Pages.

The EPR Paradox and the quantum correlations described by Bell's Inequality theorem, are explained as arising from the behavior of entities that manifest only a single bit of information, such as noisy, band-limited, polarized coins.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2293] viXra:1804.0122 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-08 15:14:44

Fractal Prime Universe V 3.0

Authors: David E Fuller
Comments: 9 Pages. It is Accurate

The Universe is a Fractal Net of Primes (planck length)/((2.99792458e-36 m)) / phi^(7/2) = 1.00051886735 Planck Length = 1.6153902e-35
Category: Quantum Physics

[2292] viXra:1804.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-08 18:28:37

Fractal Prime Universe V 4.0

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 11 Pages. It is Accurate

The Universe is a Fractal Prime Number Matrix
Category: Quantum Physics

[2291] viXra:1804.0117 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-07 07:51:44

Different Spin on Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 23 Pages.

Now a team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. [15] A group of researchers from institutions in Korea and the United States has determined how to employ a type of electron microscopy to cause regions within an iron-based superconductor to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states. [14] In new research, scientists at the University of Minnesota used a first-of-its-kind device to demonstrate a way to control the direction of the photocurrent without deploying an electric voltage. [13] Brown University researchers have demonstrated for the first time a method of substantially changing the spatial coherence of light. [12] Researchers at the University of Central Florida have generated what is being deemed the fastest light pulse ever developed. [11] Physicists at Chalmers University of Technology and Free University of Brussels have now found a method to significantly enhance optical force. [10] Nature Communications today published research by a team comprising Scottish and South African researchers, demonstrating entanglement swapping and teleportation of orbital angular momentum 'patterns' of light. [9] While physicists are continually looking for ways to unify the theory of relativity, which describes large-scale phenomena, with quantum theory, which describes small-scale phenomena, computer scientists are searching for technologies to build the quantum computer using Quantum Information. In August 2013, the achievement of "fully deterministic" quantum teleportation, using a hybrid technique, was reported. On 29 May 2014, scientists announced a reliable way of transferring data by quantum teleportation. Quantum teleportation of data had been done before but with highly unreliable methods. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to build the Quantum Computer with the help of Quantum Information.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2290] viXra:1804.0116 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-07 09:50:29

Wave-Particle Duality Paradox is Solved by Mutual Energy and Self-Energy Principles for Electromagnetic Field and Photon

Authors: Shuang-ren Zhao
Comments: 88 Pages.

The particle and wave duality is solved through the self-energy and the mutual energy principles. Welch has introduced the time-domain reciprocity theorem in 1960. The author have introduced the mutual energy theorem in 1987. It has been proved that the above two theorems are same theorem in time-domain or in Fourier domain. The author believe there is an energy flow from transmitting antenna to the receiving antenna. Hence this theorem is a energy theorem instead of a mathematical theorem i.e. the reciprocity theorem. The author found that the mutual energy is the part of additional energy when the two waves are superposed comparing to the situation if the two waves alone stayed in the space. It is often asked that if the two waves are identical what is the energy after the two waves are superposed, 4 or 2 times? The author's answer are 2 or 4 depending whether the sources of the waves are involved or not. However the author noticed that a more important situation, which is the superposition of two waves: one is retarded wave sent from the emitter, another is the advanced wave sent from the absorber. This situation actually described the photon. The author have found that, instead there are two photons the retarded photon and the advanced photon like some author believed, there is only one photon. The reason is that the two waves the retarded wave and the advanced wave they both bring one photon energy are sent to the space, but these energy are returned with the time-reversed waves. The additional energy because of the superpose process of the two waves is just with 1 photon's energy instead of 2 photon's energy. This energy is sent from the emitter to the absorber. These build the author's photon model. This photon model is proved by the author through the notice of the conflict between the energy conservation and both the superposition principle and the Maxwell equations for single charge. This conflict force the author introduced the mutual energy principle and the self-energy principle. Self-energy principle tell us the self-energy (the wave's energy before superposed) is time-reversal-return to its source and hence do not transfer any energy from emitter to the absorber. The mutual energy principle tell us that it is only the mutual energy flow which is responsible to transfer the energy from the emitter to the absorber. The author also proved that the mutual energy flow theorem, there is a mutual energy flow go through the emitter to the absorber. The energy transferred by mutual energy flow is equal in any surface between the emitter to the absorber. The wave function collapse process is explained by the two processes together the first is the self-energy time-revesal-return to their sources (instead of the targets), the second is that the mutual energy flow brings a photon's energy package from emitter to the absorber. The wave's probability property is also explained that is because the Maxwell equations are only partially correct or correct with some probabilities. The photon energy is transferred only when the retarded wave (one of solution of Maxwell equations) and the advanced wave (another solution of the Maxwell equations) are synchronized, otherwise the two waves are returned by two time-reversal waves which are not satisfy Maxwell equations but satisfy the time-reversal Maxwell equations. Hence 4 additional equations are added to Maxwell equations which describe the two additional time-reversal-return waves. Hence, the photon's package wave is consist of 4 waves which have 4 corresponding self-energy flows. There are two additional energy flows, which are the mutual energy flow that is responsible for transferring the energy from emitter to the absorber, the time-reversal-return energy flow which is responsible to bring the energy back from the emitter to the absorber if the absorber only obtained a part of photon.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2289] viXra:1804.0111 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-07 14:28:19

Fractal Prime Universe

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 5 Pages. It is Acurate

The Universe is a Fractal Prime Matrix
Category: Quantum Physics

[2288] viXra:1804.0110 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-07 14:56:09

Fractal Prime Universe V 2.0

Authors: David E. Fuller
Comments: 6 Pages. It is Accurate

The Universe is a Fractal Net Constructed of Primes
Category: Quantum Physics

[2287] viXra:1804.0108 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-08 01:34:04

Derivation of Forces from Matter Wave

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 7 Pages.

In this work we discuss the possibility that if matter wave is composed of two different physical fields, as in the case of the electromagnetic field which is composed of the electric field and a magnetic field, then it is possible to suggest that matter wave also produces forces, like the electric force and the magnetic force produced by the electromagnetic field. Furthermore, since the forms of forces that can be derived from matter wave has a Yukawa form and Coulomb form, it may be suggested that forces produced from matter wave are in fact related to the strong force and the electroweak force, respectively.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2286] viXra:1804.0104 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-08 03:03:12

Modeling Platform

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

All physical theories that treat dynamic geometrical problems require a modeling platform that combines Hilbert space operator technology with function theory and differential and integral calculus.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2285] viXra:1804.0083 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-05 12:49:20

Twisting Laser Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

A new method to sensitively measure the structure of molecules has been demonstrated by twisting laser light and aiming it at miniscule gold gratings to separate out wavelengths. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2284] viXra:1804.0078 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-05 15:13:40

The Particle Model for the Higgs’ Condensate and the Anomalous Geometric Diffraction

Authors: Jiri Soucek
Comments: 55 Pages. ISBN 978-3-330-03118-0

In the Standard model of elementary particles there is no concrete particle model for the Higgs’ condensate (of bare Higgs’ particles). The main goal of this study is to create and study the possible particle model for the Higgs’ condensate. We create this model as a set of non-local tachyons. Non-local tachyons are a new type of objects proposed in our previous papers which have a 3-dimensional space-like surface as a trajectory. As a consequence of this model we obtain the existence of a time constant τ0 > 0 which is a parameter of our model. We show that then there exists a geometrical part of a diffraction in the time-like two-slit experiment which makes quantum mechanics invalid at short distances. Then we introduce the dark energy hypothesis which enable us to estimate τ0 . As a main result we give the concrete experimental proposal which can be tested. Also the relation to the basic cosmological model is mentioned. At the end we discuss the generalized model for the Higgs’ condensate in which it is possible to acquire some information from the outside of the light cone and possibly also some correlations from the outside of the light cone.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2283] viXra:1804.0072 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-04 09:59:52

Particle in a Quantum $\delta$-Function Potential

Authors: Hristu Culetu
Comments: 8 Pages. I would like to have a minimal copyright license, if free.

A quantum potential $V(x,t)$ of $\delta$-function type is introduced, to describe the inertial motion of a particle. Quantum-mechanically, it is in a bound state, though classically one seems to be free. The motion of the object (micro- or macroscopic) takes place according to the Huygens-Fresnel principle. The new position of the object (wave front) plays the role of the secondary sources that maintain the propagation. The mean value of the potential energy is $-mc^{2}$. We found that the de Broglie - Bohm quantum potential is the difference between the bound energy $E = - mc^{2}/2$ from the stationary case and our potential $V(x,t)$.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2282] viXra:1804.0060 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-05 06:41:24

The Schrodinger Equation is a Statistical Equation

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 3 Pages.

export the Schrodinger equation from a new idea,Deepening people's understanding of the Schrodinger equation,Promoting people's Knowledge of the quantum world,It makes people no longer confused.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2281] viXra:1804.0058 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-05 07:09:39

Interactions Within Quantum Batteries

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 47 Pages.

Recent theoretical studies at Monash University bring us a step closer to realistic quantum batteries. [28] Some physicists are now wondering whether quantum phenomena may revolutionize conventional battery chemistry and lead to the development of an entirely new class of potentially more powerful batteries. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2280] viXra:1804.0053 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-03 07:31:57

Quantum Computing Uncertainty

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 68 Pages.

Physicists at ETH Zurich have now demonstrated an elegant way to relax this intrinsic incompatibility using a mechanical oscillator formed by a single trapped ion, opening up a route for fundamental studies and practical uses alike. [41] Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2279] viXra:1804.0022 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-02 00:01:52

The Laser of Einstein

Authors: Emil Gigov
Comments: 1 Page.

If Einstein discovered the laser, then the Brownian motion must emit laser light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2278] viXra:1804.0019 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-02 05:15:53

Quantum Electronics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2277] viXra:1804.0006 [pdf] submitted on 2018-04-02 13:06:16

Quantum Order in Disorder

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

Physical experiments were performed by Schiffer's team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. [40] Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. [39] Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2276] viXra:1803.0750 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-31 04:31:31

Metric Science

Authors: Gerhard Jan Smit, Jelle Ebel van der Schoot
Comments: 84 Pages. Addendum I includes the source codes to the algebra leading to the mathematical proof of the dimensional basic.

In this article a particle is being presented that explains all known forces of nature. The particle has no dimensions, it is a dimensional basic particle. Hence it gets the following name: 'dimensional basic' (db) particle. The core of this discovery is that the separate fundamental forces of nature: - the strong interaction, the electromagnetic interaction, the weak interaction and the gravitational interaction - are calculatable with one formula out of one principle. The statistical math of the quantum theory is set aside in favor of a goniometric approach. Gravitation is the only force that matters and the strong force, the electromagnetic force and the weak force can be explained out of gravitation while gravity itself is only caused by the curvature of dbs. The formula for the extent of curvature around a db is: √(2+2+2)×=1 (0) In the formula: x, y, z, are coordinates in spacetime [m], Kr = curvature [m-1].
Category: Quantum Physics

[2275] viXra:1803.0723 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 19:33:34

A Review on Entanglement and Maxwell-Dirac Isomorphism

Authors: Victor Christianto, Florentin Smarandache
Comments: 8 Pages. This paper has been submitted to Prespacetime Journal. Your comments are welcome

In RG forum, one senior professor of physics posted a project called: “Future science and technology.” As a response, one of us (VC) wrote in reply: “I think one of future science's tasks is to discover the link between entanglement and classical electromagnetic theory. This is to fulfill Einstein's position that present QM theory is incomplete, a new one must be found. We are on a way to that goal.” Therefore, in this paper we will discuss how entanglement can be explained in terms of Maxwell-Dirac isomorphism. This short review may be considered as Einstein’s dream of completing QM in a classical picture.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2274] viXra:1803.0720 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 19:42:23

On Fundamental Flaws of Everett’s Many Worlds Interpretation of QM, and Plausible Resolution based on Maxwell-Dirac Isomorphism

Authors: Victor Christianto, Florentin Smarandache
Comments: 10 Pages. This paper has been submitted to a journal. Comments are welcome

Despite its enormous practical success, many physicists and philosophers alike agree that the quantum theory is so full of contradictions and paradoxes which are difficult to solve consistently. Even after 90 years, the experts themselves still do not all agree what to make of it. The area of disagreement centers primarily around the problem of describing observations. Formally, the so-called quantum measurement problem can be defined as follows: the result of a measurement is a superposition of vectors, each representing the quantity being observed as having one of its possible values. The question that has to be answered is how this superposition can be reconciled with the fact that in practice we only observe one value. How is the measuring instrument prodded into making up its mind which value it has observed? Among some alternatives to resolve the above QM measurement problem, a very counterintuitive one was suggested by Hugh Everett III in his 1955 dissertation, which was subsequently called the Many-Worlds Interpretation of QM (MWI). In this paper we will not discuss all possible scenarios to solve the measurement problem, but we will only shortly discuss Everett’s MWI, because it has led to spurious debates on possibility of multiverses, beyond the Universe we live in. We also discuss two alternatives against MWI proposal: (a) the so-called scale symmetry theory, (b) the Maxwell-Dirac isomorphism.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2273] viXra:1803.0712 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 08:06:56

OpenFermion Quantum Computer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 46 Pages.

A collaboration of scientists led by Google, and including physicists from Leiden University and TU Delft, have developed a practice tool for chemists called OpenFermion. [28] Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are conducting fundamental physics research that will lead to more control over mercurial quantum systems and materials. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2272] viXra:1803.0711 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-29 09:11:31

Simplest Refutation of Bell's Inequality © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Right Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All right reserved. info@cec-services dot com

See within
Category: Quantum Physics

[2271] viXra:1803.0705 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 14:02:19

How Magnets Work :an Alternative Explanation

Authors: Fenton J. Doolan
Comments: 4 pages

In Science we explain that a magnet work by the assumption it consists of small entities called domains. The orientation these 'small magnets' or domains determines whether or not the metal will be magnetised or not. So in essence in Science we explain how magnets work by saying they are made up of little magnets. This paper discuss an alternate explanation of how magnets work. We invoke an electromagnetic explanation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2270] viXra:1803.0691 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 05:44:41

Laser Control of Electrons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

Femtosecond lasers are capable of processing any solid material with high quality and high precision using their ultrafast and ultra-intense characteristics. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2269] viXra:1803.0688 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 09:01:46

Charging Quantum Batteries

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

Some physicists are now wondering whether quantum phenomena may revolutionize conventional battery chemistry and lead to the development of an entirely new class of potentially more powerful batteries. [27] Physicists in Italy have designed a " quantum battery " that they say could be built using today's solid-state technology. [26] Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2268] viXra:1803.0687 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-28 09:32:11

Causal Order in Quantum Mechanics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences develop a new theoretical framework to describe how causal structures in quantum mechanics transform. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2267] viXra:1803.0683 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 11:26:32

Molecular Prison Forces

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 45 Pages.

A team of scientists including Carnegie's Tim Strobel and Venkata Bhadram now report unexpected quantum behavior of hydrogen molecules, H2, trapped within tiny cages made of organic molecules, demonstrating that the structure of the cage influences the behavior of the molecule imprisoned inside it. [32] A potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2266] viXra:1803.0682 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 13:25:33

Subatomic Computational Microscope

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

Scientists have built a "computational microscope" that can simulate the atomic and subatomic forces that drive molecular interactions. [35] Researchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons. [34] Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2265] viXra:1803.0671 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-26 11:49:52

Materials for Quantum Computing

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Researches of scientists from South Ural State University are implemented within this area. [25] Following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Dr. Uriel Levy and his team have created technology that will enable computers and all optic communication devices to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2264] viXra:1803.0664 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 05:07:03

Quasicrystal Superconductivity

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Now, in a study in Nature Communications, a research team led by Nagoya University has discovered superconductivity in a QC for the first time. [37] University of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2263] viXra:1803.0662 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 06:36:52

Energy from Fluctuation of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a method and a material that generate an electrical impulse when the light fluctuates from sunshine to shade and vice versa. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2262] viXra:1803.0659 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-27 07:37:52

Self-Assembling Quantum Materials

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 44 Pages.

A potential revolution in device engineering could be underway, thanks to the discovery of functional electronic interfaces in quantum materials that can self-assemble spontaneously. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2261] viXra:1803.0657 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-25 13:17:52

Global Madness

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 6 Pages.

Humanity is in danger, physicists are blinded by unrealistic theories/conclusions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2260] viXra:1803.0655 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-25 18:32:38

Heisenberg Quantum Probabilities. God Does Not Throw Dice at the Planck Scale, but Below!

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 6 Pages.

In this paper we suggest that working with the Planck mass and its link to other particles in a simple way it possible to ``convert" the Heisenberg uncertainty principle into a very simple quantum probabilistic model. We further combine this with key elements from special relativity theory and get an interesting quantum relativistic probability theory. Some of the key points presented here could help to eliminate negative (pseudo) probabilities that often are used in standard quantum mechanics. These fake probabilities may be rooted in a failure to understand the Heisenberg principle fully in relation to the Planck mass. When properly understood, the Heisenberg principle seems to give a probabilistic range of quantum probabilities that are sound. There are no instantaneous probabilities and the maximum probability is always unity. In our formulation, the Planck mass particle is always related to a probability of one. Thus, we have certainty at the Planck scale for the Planck mass particle or for particles accelerated to reach Planck energy, but only for one Planck second.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2259] viXra:1803.0645 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-26 05:25:31

Formulation of Dirac Equation for an Arbitrary Field from a System of Linear First Order Partial Differential Equations

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 5 Pages.

In our previous works we formulated Dirac equation for a free quantum particle and Maxwell field equations for the electromagnetic field from a system of linear first order partial differential equations. In this work we show that it is possible to formulate Dirac equation for the case when the quantum particle is under the influence of an external field, such as the electromagnetic field, also from a system of linear first order partial differential equations.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2258] viXra:1803.0634 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-23 22:47:05

Harmonic Unity of Atom Spectrum

Authors: Oleg G. Verin
Comments: 22 Pages.

Recent discovery of the laws of atomic electron shells formation [1] enables to have absolutely new view at the nature of atom spectrum. In particular, the fractional values of a main quantum number testify to excitation of multiple resonances of electronic shells of atoms making for each atom a «special» spectrum. In spite of all diversity of characteristics the regularities showing harmonic unity of each atom clearly appear, that, undoubtedly, becomes reliable guiding line for researchers and will be useful at the analysis and systematization of atomic spectrums. This article is a continuation of study of atomic electron shells properties on the basis of reference data confirmed by trusty experiments.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2257] viXra:1803.0628 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-24 07:01:39

Jupiter and the Inverter Magnet Mechanism

Authors: Fenton J. Doolan
Comments: 2 pages

It is hypothesised that Jupiter acts like a gigantic inverter magnet. The recent infrared images of Jupiter north and south poles from the orbiting satellite Juno clearly show 'cyclones' that form the inverter magnet structure. It is thus concluded that the sun and all planets in our solar system ( except possibly Venus ) are acting like inverter magnets. The force of attraction between heavenly bodies is magnetic or electromagnetic in nature.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2256] viXra:1803.0626 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-24 09:21:10

A New Approach to Quantum Mechanics I :Overview

Authors: Juno Ryu
Comments: 33 Pages.

In this article, a new topological way to define first quantization procedure is overviewed. Technical ingredients and metaphysical ideas used throughout this series of works are introduced in a way as non-technical as possible for motivating both physically and mathematically interested readers. This overview contains schematic summary of part II and part III of this series.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2255] viXra:1803.0544 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-23 13:38:18

3-D Single-Atom Measurements

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

Researchers at Griffith University working with Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have unveiled a stunningly accurate technique for scientific measurements which uses a single atom as the sensor, with sensitivity down to 100 zeptoNewtons. [34] Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing. [27] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2254] viXra:1803.0395 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-22 04:40:53

Massa uit het Niets

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. Dit behoort bij het Hilbert Book Model Project

Massa blijkt een vluchtige eigenschap te zijn die uit het niets lijkt voort te komen en snel verwatert in het toenemende volume van het universum
Category: Quantum Physics

[2253] viXra:1803.0388 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 10:54:41

Generating Mass from Nothing

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. This is part of the Hilbert Book Model Project

Having mass stands for having the capability to deform the living space of the owner of the mass. This description makes mass a very transient property that recurrently must be regenerated because deformations spread over the living space. Consequently, deformations quickly fade away. It looks as if mass generates out of nothing and then dilutes into nothing.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2252] viXra:1803.0385 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 14:34:33

Diamond Maser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 22 Pages.

Lead researcher Dr Jonathan Breeze, from Imperial's Department of Materials, said: "This breakthrough paves the way for the widespread adoption of masers and opens the door for a wide array of applications that we are keen to explore. We hope the maser will now enjoy as much success as the laser." [11] Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. [10] Nearly 75 years ago, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Erwin Schrödinger wondered if the mysterious world of quantum mechanics played a role in biology. A recent finding by Northwestern University's Prem Kumar adds further evidence that the answer might be yes. [9] A UNSW Australia-led team of researchers has discovered how algae that survive in very low levels of light are able to switch on and off a weird quantum phenomenon that occurs during photosynthesis. [8] This paper contains the review of quantum entanglement investigations in living systems, and in the quantum mechanically modeled photoactive prebiotic kernel systems. [7] The human body is a constant flux of thousands of chemical/biological interactions and processes connecting molecules, cells, organs, and fluids, throughout the brain, body, and nervous system. Up until recently it was thought that all these interactions operated in a linear sequence, passing on information much like a runner passing the baton to the next runner. However, the latest findings in quantum biology and biophysics have discovered that there is in fact a tremendous degree of coherence within all living systems. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the Wave-Particle Duality and the electron's spin also, building the Bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators explains the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions by the diffraction patterns. The Weak Interaction changes the diffraction patterns by moving the electric charge from one side to the other side of the diffraction pattern, which violates the CP and Time reversal symmetry. The diffraction patterns and the locality of the self-maintaining electromagnetic potential explains also the Quantum Entanglement, giving it as a natural part of the Relativistic Quantum Theory and making possible to understand the Quantum Biology.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2251] viXra:1803.0379 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 05:24:45

Crystal Lattice from Polaritons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 43 Pages.

An international research team produced an analog of a solid-body crystal lattice from polaritons, hybrid photon-electron quasiparticles. [31] Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2250] viXra:1803.0372 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 07:30:24

High-Speed Quantum Internet

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have rediscovered a material that could be the basis for ultra-high-speed quantum internet. [38] A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2249] viXra:1803.0363 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 07:52:52

Ultra - Light Communication an be Achieved Immediately

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 19 Pages.

Through the analysis of several key experiments, the influence of the detector's advantages and disadvantages on the micro world is demonstrated.and the interaction of the photons is pointed out. This interaction is not a superdistance force, but it can indeed be faster than the speed of light. It determines the interference of the photon, using it to achieve superlight communication.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2248] viXra:1803.0354 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 08:17:29

Time Scale on Optical Clock

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 64 Pages.

(NICT) generated a real-time signal of an accurate time scale by combining an optical lattice clock and a hydrogen maser. [38] To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2247] viXra:1803.0338 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 09:16:18

Double Life Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

Now scientists have probed the superconducting behavior of its electrons in detail for the first time. They discovered it's even weirder than they thought. Yet that's good news, they said, because it gives them a new angle for thinking about what's known as "high temperature" superconductivity, a phenomenon that could be harnessed for a future generation of perfectly efficient power lines, levitating trains and other revolutionary technologies. [36] University of Groningen physicists, and colleagues from Nijmegen and Hong Kong, have induced superconductivity in a monolayer of tungsten disulfide. [35] One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2246] viXra:1803.0312 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 08:28:04

Two Dimensions Quantum Bits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Two novel materials, each composed of a single atomic layer and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, are the ingredients for a novel kind of quantum dot. [28] A "superacid" much stronger than automobile battery acid has enabled a key advance toward a new generation of LED lighting that's safer, less expensive and more user friendly. [27] Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2245] viXra:1803.0307 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 11:40:13

Electron Spi 1/2 is "Hidden" Electromagnetic Field Angular Momentum

Authors: U. Kayser-Herold
Comments: 5 Pages.

This is to present and discuss an alternative method for precise analytical determination of electron spin angular momentum 1/2. The method is based on the Lorentz-force acting on a point-like charge moved through the entire magnetic dipole-field of the electron. The result hbar/2 coincides with a previous result based on Lagrangian electrodynamics and confirms the "hidden" electromagnetic origin of spin angular momentum. Both methods reveal a key role of the "classical" electron radius.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2244] viXra:1803.0302 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-20 14:05:15

Flying Microlaser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

To create the flying microlaser, the researchers launched laser light into a water-filled hollow core fiber to optically trap the microparticle. Like the materials used to make traditional lasers, the microparticle incorporates a gain medium. [37] Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2243] viXra:1803.0292 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-21 02:34:01

Waves Generate Electrons and Both Are Quantized Into Phosons

Authors: Yasen Ali Mohammad Al Azzam
Comments: 20 Pages. 20

This paper is a study of the behavior of light waves from a purely particles’ point of view. I started with showing that waves consist of fundamental units of mass (I called phosons) which are identical in all waves, don’t depend on any wave’s parameter, have the same mass and carry the same energy. By interpreting Compton’s effect experiment from a different point of view, I educed the mass of the phoson and explained how waves and electrons are quantized into phosons and how the electron’s mass and energy are the summation of masses and energies of the phosons comprising its mass. Since my work contradicts with the theory of relativity, I found it mandatory to find an alternative which works at all speeds and give more logical results. After finding the nature of the phoson’s mass with the new definition of the relativistic mass at the speed of light, everything became ready to propose a model to describe the phosons behavior and propagation as a continuous energy transformation between two forms of kinetic energies and a continuous mass variation between two levels. The model explains the actual meaning of mc² and how even if we believe in mass energy equivalency, both are conserved individually. At last I proposed how electrons are generated by waves’ and how these phosons shape the electron.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2242] viXra:1803.0281 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-19 09:19:57

The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Detector

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 16 Pages.

Through the analysis of several key experiments, this paper makes an in-depth demonstration.The impact of the detector on the micro world,Make it clear to the reader.The truth of wave-particle duality.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2241] viXra:1803.0279 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-19 12:19:56

New Platforms for Quantum Circuitry

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 34 Pages.

If a metal or other conductive material could be made to resemble such a kagome pattern at the atomic scale, with individual atoms arranged in similar triangular patterns, it should in theory exhibit exotic electronic properties. [21] Each individual molecule can conduct electrons. This phenomenon is interesting because the conducting molecules produce unique quantum properties that could potentially be useful in electronics such as transistors, superconducting switches and gas sensors. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14] For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. [13] Physicists have shown that the three main types of engines (four-stroke, twostroke, and continuous) are thermodynamically equivalent in a certain quantum regime, but not at the classical level. [12]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2240] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-18 18:54:21

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 11 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe. This is a first draft that we plan to develop into a longer paper later on. Thus we are laying out the most important key concepts and more detailed description will be provided in future versions of the paper. Constructive comments are welcome.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2239] viXra:1803.0262 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-18 01:34:06

Double Slit Experiment

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 3 Pages.

The double slit experiment has a measurement problem, phycists believe that the results are magical but they are not. They don't realize that there is a hidden element in that experiment, that interference pattern is not caused by the particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2238] viXra:1803.0239 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-17 02:59:08

Maxwell Field Equations in Euclidean Relativity

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 8 Pages.

In this work we formulate Maxwell field equations in Euclidean relativity. Since there is no upper limit for the speed of transmission in Euclidean relativity, the Euclidean relativistic electromagnetic field and the Euclidean relativistic Dirac field may be applied to rectify the EPR paradox in quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2237] viXra:1803.0233 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 07:55:12

Quantum Spin Liquid Prepared

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 42 Pages.

Now, for the first time ever, researchers from Aalto University, Brazilian Center for Research in Physics (CBPF), Technical University of Braunschweig and Nagoya University have produced the superconductor-like quantum spin liquid predicted by Anderson. [30] Electrons in graphene—an atomically thin, flexible and incredibly strong substance that has captured the imagination of materials scientists and physicists alike—move at the speed of light, and behave like they have no mass. [29] In a series of exciting experiments, Cambridge researchers experienced weightlessness testing graphene's application in space. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2236] viXra:1803.0231 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 09:33:47

Diodes Made of Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

'Haye and his team at NPL have created an optical version of a diode that transmits light in one direction only, and can be integrated in microphotonic circuits. [25] Operation at the single-photon level raises the possibility of developing entirely new communication and computing devices, ranging from hardware random number generators to quantum computers. [24] Considerable interest in new single-photon detector technologies has been scaling in this past decade. [23] Engineers develop key mathematical formula for driving quantum experiments. [22] Physicists are developing quantum simulators, to help solve problems that are beyond the reach of conventional computers. [21] Engineers at Australia's University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel 'flip-flop qubits', that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper-and easier-than thought possible. [20] A team of researchers from the U.S. and Italy has built a quantum memory device that is approximately 1000 times smaller than similar devices— small enough to install on a chip. [19] The cutting edge of data storage research is working at the level of individual atoms and molecules, representing the ultimate limit of technological miniaturisation. [18] This is an important clue for our theoretical understanding of optically controlled magnetic data storage media. [17] A crystalline material that changes shape in response to light could form the heart of novel light-activated devices. [16] Now a team of Penn State electrical engineers have a way to simultaneously control diverse optical properties of dielectric waveguides by using a two-layer coating, each layer with a near zero thickness and weight. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2235] viXra:1803.0230 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 10:02:19

Spin-Based Memory Storage

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

A voltage sensing scheme developed by researchers from Singapore could improve the accuracy of reading data from spin-based memory systems with only minimal modifications. [24] When the energy efficiency of electronics poses a challenge, magnetic materials may have a solution. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2234] viXra:1803.0220 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-16 02:37:45

Compact Fiber Optic Sensor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

Researchers have developed a new flexible sensor with high sensitivity that is designed to perform variety of chemical and biological analyses in very small spaces. [37] In a new paper published today in Science Advances, researchers under the direction of Columbia Engineering Professors Michal Lipson and Alexander Gaeta (Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics) have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized chip. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2233] viXra:1803.0218 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 06:27:40

Magnon Spin Currents

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

In the emerging field of magnon spintronics, researchers seek to transport and process information by means of so-called magnon spin currents. [25] Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2232] viXra:1803.0217 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 08:22:32

On the Dark Covering Capacity of Light and the Unification of Dark with Light

Authors: Tejas Chandrakant Thakare.
Comments: 10 Pages.

Light has properties such as polarization, interference, diffraction etc. This paper presents the new property of light and its relation with dark. This relation also useful for describing dark in terms of light`s parameter. We treated dark as absence of light but this paper presents dark`s systematical description and hence presents dark`s relation with light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2231] viXra:1803.0216 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 09:14:20

No Actually Quantum Speed Limits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 17 Pages.

The results are surprising, as previous research has suggested that quantum speed limits are purely quantum in nature and vanish for classical systems. [30] In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only so closely together, before they overlap or short-circuit. If companies are to continue building ever-faster computers, something will need to change. [29] This new understanding of the origin of magnetic flux noise could lead to frequency-tunable superconducting qubits with improved dephasing times for practical quantum computers. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits—circuits that have zero electrical resistance—can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2230] viXra:1803.0209 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 13:08:18

Single Molecule Electrical Conductance

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 31 Pages.

Each individual molecule can conduct electrons. This phenomenon is interesting because the conducting molecules produce unique quantum properties that could potentially be useful in electronics such as transistors, superconducting switches and gas sensors. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14] For more than a century and a half of physics, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, which states that entropy always increases, has been as close to inviolable as any law we know. In this universe, chaos reigns supreme. [13] Physicists have shown that the three main types of engines (four-stroke, twostroke, and continuous) are thermodynamically equivalent in a certain quantum regime, but not at the classical level. [12] For the first time, physicists have performed an experiment confirming that thermodynamic processes are irreversible in a quantum system—meaning that, even on the quantum level, you can't put a broken egg back into its shell. The results have implications for understanding thermodynamics in quantum systems and, in turn, designing quantum computers and other quantum information technologies. [11]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2229] viXra:1803.0203 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 03:53:57

Cold Plasma Quantum Mechanics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

University of British Columbia researchers have found a new system that could help yield 'warmer' quantum technologies. [38] A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2228] viXra:1803.0201 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-15 04:40:16

Confirmation of Pauli Exclusion Principle © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The title says it all in this rather trivial proof.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2227] viXra:1803.0199 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 06:13:56

Quantum Simulation of Topological Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Symmetry plays a fundamental role in understanding complex quantum matter, particularly in classifying topological quantum phases, which have attracted great interests in the recent decade. [25] Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2226] viXra:1803.0197 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 09:37:08

Steep Quantum Walls for Atoms

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Now, a team of scientists from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), in collaboration with researchers from the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Innsbruck, Austria, has circumvented the wavelength limit by leveraging the atoms' inherent quantum features, which should allow atomic lattice neighbors to get closer than ever before. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2225] viXra:1803.0193 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-14 12:43:36

Researchers at Mit and Harvard University Found that Photons Interaction Proved the Theory I Proposed More Than 20 Years Ago

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 4 Pages.

Remind people to pay attention to it,The most influential scientific journal of the 2017, science,Points out the articles in the journal Science,It proves Cui Hailong's theory more than 20 years ago.The latest experiment introduced in this article is a big step in the right direction.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2224] viXra:1803.0190 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-13 07:42:57

Electric Charge is not a Seperate Entity

Authors: Ranganath G Kulkarni
Comments: 1 Page.

The quantization of energy is due to the existence of smallest unit of energy. This leads to quantization of electric charge. We find that electric charge is equivalent to mass.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2223] viXra:1803.0183 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-13 11:10:25

Quantum Communication

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 7 Pages.

Great theories give birth to great industries, ignoring my theory, Will make America lose its great 20 years, lost hundreds of thousands of billion dollar industry, this is not the American people are willing to see, is not allowed by the American people, it's not your responsibility is allowed My theory is that, The theory that immediately makes quantum communication possible,Not a quantum key,Instead, quantum communication,Quantum keys can be cracked,Quantum communication is the only thing Our goal.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2222] viXra:1803.0172 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 09:30:15

Polarizations as States and Their Evolution in Geometric Algebra Terms with Variable Complex Plane

Authors: Alexander Soiguine
Comments: 10 Pages.

Recently suggested scheme of quantum computing uses g-qubit states as circular polarizations from the solution of Maxwell equations in terms of geometric algebra, along with clear definition of a complex plane as bivector in three dimensions. Here all the details of receiving the solution, and its polarization transformations are analyzed. The results can particularly be applied to the problems of quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The suggested formalism replaces conventional quantum mechanics states as objects constructed in complex vector Hilbert space framework by geometrically feasible framework of multivectors.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2221] viXra:1803.0167 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 11:21:36

Quantum Magnetic Wave

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 40 Pages.

Working together, Miller, Boehme, Vardeny and their colleagues have shown that an organic-based magnet can carry waves of quantum mechanical magnetization, called magnons, and convert those waves to electrical signals. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2220] viXra:1803.0162 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 04:14:01

A Decisive Experiment

Authors: CuiHaiLong
Comments: 4 Pages.

By reviewing the history of science, we discussed the criteria of testing science theory, criticized the most fashionable concept in twentieth Century, and put forward a concrete plan to achieve super light speed communication.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2219] viXra:1803.0160 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-12 05:44:31

Metastable Quantum Matter

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 38 Pages.

The phenomenon of metastability, in which a system is in a state that is stable but not the one of least energy, is widely observed in nature and technology. [25] Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2218] viXra:1803.0155 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 09:51:26

How Laser Start from Chaos

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Lasers that emit ultrashort pulses of light are critical components of technologies, including communications and industrial processing, and have been central to fundamental Nobel Prize-winning research in physics. [36] A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2217] viXra:1803.0153 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 11:07:41

Ultra-Cold Quantum Gas

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Four decades after it was predicted, scientist create a skyrmion, and take one step towards efficient nuclear fusion. [24] While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17] Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD have realized the control of thermal and electrical currents in nanoscale devices by means of quantum local observations. [16] Physicists have proposed a new type of Maxwell's demon—the hypothetical agent that extracts work from a system by decreasing the system's entropy—in which the demon can extract work just by making a measurement, by taking advantage of quantum fluctuations and quantum superposition. [15] Pioneering research offers a fascinating view into the inner workings of the mind of 'Maxwell's Demon', a famous thought experiment in physics. [14]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2216] viXra:1803.0151 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-10 15:43:54

A Speculative Relationship Between the Proton Mass, the Proton Radius, and the Fine Structure Constant and Between the Fine Structure Constant and the Hagedorn Temperature

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this short note we present a possible connection between the proton radius and the proton mass using the fine structure constant. The Hagedorn temperature is related to the energy levels assumed to be required to free the quarks from the proton, where hadronic matter is unstable. We also speculate that there could be a connection between the Hagedorn temperature and the Planck temperature through the fine structure constant. Whether there is something to this, or it is purely a coincidence, we will leave to others and future research to explore. However, we think these possible relationships are worth further investigation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2215] viXra:1803.0146 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-11 03:26:27

Crisis in Quantum Field Theory and Its Overcoming (Axiomatic Approach Versus Heuristic)

Authors: Kyriakos A.G.
Comments: 24 Pages.

Many known scientists have noted the presence of crisis in fundamental physics. Despite mathematical success, quantum theory not answers many questions that are asked by scientists. Which of our basic physical assumptions are wrong? What we need to change? The proposed article tries to answer these questions using a new approach.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2214] viXra:1803.0143 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-10 06:57:13

Refutation of Tensor Product and Bernstein-Vazirani Algorithm © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

The tensor product and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm are sequentially refuted.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2213] viXra:1803.0139 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-10 10:37:38

Quantum Photonic Technology

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 35 Pages.

While standard quantum hardware entangles particles in two states, the team has found a way to generate and entangle pairs of particles that each has 15 states. [23] An exotic state of matter that is dazzling scientists with its electrical properties, can also exhibit unusual optical properties, as shown in a theoretical study by researchers at A*STAR. [22] The breakthrough was made in the lab of Andrea Alù, director of the ASRC's Photonics Initiative. Alù and his colleagues from The City College of New York, University of Texas at Austin and Tel Aviv University were inspired by the seminal work of three British researchers who won the 2016 Noble Prize in Physics for their work, which teased out that particular properties of matter (such as electrical conductivity) can be preserved in certain materials despite continuous changes in the matter's form or shape. [21] Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technology for switching heat flows 'on' or 'off'. [20] Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. [19] A team of researchers with the University of California and SRI International has developed a new type of cooling device that is both portable and efficient. [18] Thermal conductivity is one of the most crucial physical properties of matter when it comes to understanding heat transport, hydrodynamic evolution and energy balance in systems ranging from astrophysical objects to fusion plasmas. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2212] viXra:1803.0137 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 16:16:33

On EPR Paradox and Matter Wave in Euclidean Relativity

Authors: Vu B Ho
Comments: 7 Pages.

: In our previous works, we showed that the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox could be resolved by constructing a Euclidean relativity that not only leads to the same results obtained from Einstein general relativity but also permits an instantaneous transmission of interaction. However, there still remains the question about the nature of these physical fields and their mathematical formulations if they exist. In this work we show that it is possible to formulate Euclidean relativistic field equations similar Dirac equation from a general system of linear first order partial differential equation. Since the speeds of the Euclidean relativistic fields have no upper values, they can be used to rectify the quantum entanglement in quantum mechanics.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2211] viXra:1803.0134 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 21:32:28

Proton Puzzle

Authors: Piscedda Giampaolo
Comments: 4 Pages.

Through a further analysis on the problem of the muon proton radius, the enormous complexity of the ether is highlighted.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2210] viXra:1803.0126 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 07:39:07

Visibility into Quantum Information Transfer

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 65 Pages.

A QEG team has provided unprecedented visibility into the spread of information in large quantum mechanical systems, via a novel measurement methodology and metric described in a new article in Physics Review Letters. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2209] viXra:1803.0125 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 08:22:53

The Generalized Bernstein-Vazirani Algorithm for Determining an Integer String

Authors: Koji Nagata, Tadao Nakamura, Han Geurdes, Josep Batle, Ahmed Farouk, Do Ngoc Diep
Comments: 3 pages

We present the generalized Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm for determining a restricted integer string. Given the set of real values $\{a_1,a_2,a_3,\ldots,a_N\}$ and a function $g:{\bf R}\rightarrow {\bf Z}$, we shall determine the following values $\{g(a_1),g(a_2),g(a_3),\ldots, g(a_N)\}$ simultaneously. The speed of determining the values is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of $N$. The method determines the maximum of and the minimum of the function $g$ that the finite domain is $\{a_1,a_2,a_3,\ldots,a_N\}$.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2208] viXra:1803.0120 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 11:42:29

Topological Superconductor Solve Decoherence in Quantum Computers

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 14 Pages.

A team of researchers from Japan, the U.S. and China, has identified a topological superconducting phase for possible use in an iron-based material in quantum computers. [28] Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits—circuits that have zero electrical resistance—can function as piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Exciton-mediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2207] viXra:1803.0113 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-09 04:18:41

Entangled Quantum Light

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Researchers have demonstrated the first quantum light-emitting diode (LED) that emits single photons and entangled photon pairs with a wavelength of around 1550 nm, which lies within the standard telecommunications window. [36] JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2206] viXra:1803.0107 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-08 10:32:37

Light-Speed Electron with Laser

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 63 Pages.

A paper published in the journal Physical Review X presents evidence of a radiation reaction occurring when a high-intensity laser pulse collides with a high-energy electron beam. [37] Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2205] viXra:1803.0101 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-07 05:41:57

Precision Atom Qubits

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 66 Pages.

A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2204] viXra:1803.0099 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-07 08:52:21

Maxwell's Demon in Quantum Zeno

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 30 Pages.

It's well-known that when a quantum system is continuously measured, it freezes, i.e., it stops changing, which is due to a phenomenon called the quantum Zeno effect. [18] Physicists have extended one of the most prominent fluctuation theorems of classical stochastic thermodynamics, the Jarzynski equality, to quantum field theory. [17] In 1993, physicist Lucien Hardy proposed an experiment showing that there is a small probability (around 6-9%) of observing a particle and its antiparticle interacting with each other without annihilating—something that is impossible in classical physics. [16] Scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, recently reengineered their data processing, demonstrating that 16 million atoms were entangled in a one-centimetre crystal. [15] The fact that it is possible to retrieve this lost information reveals new insight into the fundamental nature of quantum measurements, mainly by supporting the idea that quantum measurements contain both quantum and classical components. [14] Researchers blur the line between classical and quantum physics by connecting chaos and entanglement. [13] Yale University scientists have reached a milestone in their efforts to extend the durability and dependability of quantum information. [12] Using lasers to make data storage faster than ever. [11] Some three-dimensional materials can exhibit exotic properties that only exist in "lower" dimensions. For example, in one-dimensional chains of atoms that emerge within a bulk sample, electrons can separate into three distinct entities, each carrying information about just one aspect of the electron's identity—spin, charge, or orbit. The spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, has been known to control magnetism in certain insulating materials whose electron spins can point in any direction and easily flip direction. Now, a new study just published in Science reveals that spinons are also present in a metallic material in which the orbital movement of electrons around the atomic nucleus is the driving force behind the material's strong magnetism. [10] Currently studying entanglement in condensed matter systems is of great interest. This interest stems from the fact that some behaviors of such systems can only be explained with the aid of entanglement. [9] Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Cambridge in the UK have demonstrated that it is possible to directly generate an electric current in a magnetic material by rotating its magnetization. [8] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the electric current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the changing relativistic mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2203] viXra:1803.0084 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 11:03:37

Light and Matter Coupling

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Researchers from Würzburg and London have succeeded in controlling the coupling of light and matter at room temperature. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2202] viXra:1803.0080 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 14:23:55

Refutation of Quantum Computing on the Unitary Operator © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

The standard unitary operator is not tautologous. It can be coerced into tautology with two steps: 1. Reversing the order of the antecedent with the consequent in the equivalency; and 2. Replacing the equivalence connective with the implication connective. However, that result is not quantum computing as universally defined, but something else.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2201] viXra:1803.0076 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 01:44:19

Finite Statistics Loophole in CH, Eberhard, CHSH Inequalities

Authors: Justin Lee
Comments: 16 Pages.

Clauser-Horne (CH) inequality, Eberhard inequality, and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality are used to determine whether quantum entanglement can contradict local realism. However, the "finite statistics" loophole is known to allow local realism to violate these inequalities if a sample size is small [1]. Remarkably though, this paper shows that this loophole in conjunction with an improper statistical analysis and incorrect singles counts can cause a violation of Eberhard inequality even with a large sample size, e.g. a 13 sigma violation was achieved despite 12,000,000 total trials in a Monte Carlo simulation of a local realist photonic experiment, and furthermore, a 27 sigma violation was produced when a small, acceptable 0.2% production rate loophole was applied. In order to properly analyze the data, a sample mean of Eberhard inequality values should be used to calculate the statistical strength, instead of using an aggregate Eberhard inequality value, and the correct singles counts should be used. Secondly, this paper shows that if a sample size does not far exceed the "large enough" value for the normal approximation of a Binomial distribution, it can still violate these inequalities, e.g. CHSH violation of 2:43 +/- 0:31 was achieved with 280 total trials and 2:16 +/- 0:13 even with 3,000 total trials. This paper introduces the aforementioned loopholes as plausible local realist explanations to two observed violations reported by Giustina, et al. [2], and Hensen, et al. [3].
Category: Quantum Physics

[2200] viXra:1803.0073 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-06 03:20:57

Graphene Insulator or Superconductor

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 25 Pages.

One can also imagine making a superconducting transistor out of graphene, which you can switch on and off, from superconducting to insulating. That opens many possibilities for quantum devices." [34] A team of scientists has detected a hidden state of electronic order in a layered material containing lanthanum, barium, copper, and oxygen (LBCO). [33] Now in a new study, researchers have discovered the existence of a positive feedback loop that gratly enhances the superconductivity of cuprates and may shed light on the origins of high-temperature cuprate superconductivity— considered one of the most important open questions in physics. [33] Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have found an exotic state of matter where the constituent particles pair up when limited to two dimensions. [32] Neutron diffraction at the Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering has clarified the absence of magnetic order and classified the superconductivity of a new next-generation of superconductors in a paper published in Europhysics Letters. [31] A potential new state of matter is being reported in the journal Nature, with research showing that among superconducting materials in high magnetic fields, the phenomenon of electronic symmetry breaking is common. [30] Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in Switzerland and the Technical University Munich in Germany have lifted the veil on the electronic characteristics of high-temperature superconductors. Their research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the electronic densities measured in these superconductors are a combination of two separate effects. As a result, they propose a new model that suggests the existence of two coexisting states rather than competing ones postulated for the past thirty years, a small revolution in the world of superconductivity. [29] A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory combined powerful magnetic pulses with some of the brightest X-rays on the planet to discover a surprising 3-D arrangement of a material's electrons that appears closely linked to a mysterious phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity. [28] Advanced x-ray technique reveals surprising quantum excitations that persist through materials with or without superconductivity. [27] This paper explains the magnetic effect of the superconductive current from the observed effects of the accelerating electrons, causing naturally the experienced changes of the electric field potential along the electric wire. The accelerating electrons explain not only the Maxwell Equations and the Special Relativity, but the Heisenberg Uncertainty Relation, the wave particle duality and the electron's spin also, building the bridge between the Classical and Quantum Theories. The changing acceleration of the electrons explains the created negative electric field of the magnetic induction, the Higgs Field, the changing Relativistic Mass and the Gravitational Force, giving a Unified Theory of the physical forces. Taking into account the Planck Distribution Law of the electromagnetic oscillators also, we can explain the electron/proton mass rate and the Weak and Strong Interactions. Since the superconductivity is basically a quantum mechanical phenomenon and some entangled particles give this opportunity to specific matters, like Cooper Pairs or other entanglements, as strongly correlated materials and Excitonmediated electron pairing, we can say that the secret of superconductivity is the quantum entanglement.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2199] viXra:1803.0064 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 10:29:44

Seeing the Quantum World

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

JILA scientists have invented a new imaging technique that produces rapid, precise measurements of quantum behavior in an atomic clock in the form of near-instant visual art. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2198] viXra:1803.0060 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 00:13:14

Brief Primer on the Fundaments of Quantum Computing

Authors: Richard L Amoroso
Comments: 140 Pages.

This QC primer is based on excerpts from the breakthrough volume Universal Quantum Computing (ISBN: 978-981-3145-99-3) which touts having dissolved the remaining barriers to implementing Bulk Universal Quantum Computing (UQC), and as such most likely describes the most advanced QC development platform. Numerous books, hundreds of patents, thousands of papers and a Googolplex of considerations fill the pantheon of QC R&D. Of late QC mathemagicians claim QCs already exist; but by what chimeric definition. Does flipping a few qubits in a logic gate without an algorithm qualify as quantum computing? In physics, theory bears little weight without rigorous experimental confirmation, less if new, radical or a paradigm shift. This volume develops quantum computing based on '3rd regime' physics of Unified Field Mechanics (UFM). What distinguishes this work from a myriad of other avenues to UQC under study? Virtually all R&D paths struggle with technology and decoherence. If the currently highly favored room-sized cryogenically cooled quantum Hall anyon bilayer graphene QCs ever become successful, they would be reminiscent of the city block-sized Eniac computer of 1946. In 2017 quantum Hall techniques experimentally discovered additional dimension, said to be inaccessible and were called ‘artificial’. This scenario will not last long; the floodgates will open momentarily. Then we will have actual QCs! The QC prototype proposed herein is room temperature and tabletop. It is dramatically different in that it is not confined to the limitations of quantum mechanics; since it is based on principles of UFM, the Uncertainty Principle and Decoherence no longer apply. Thus, this QC model could be implemented on any other quantum platform!
Category: Quantum Physics

[2197] viXra:1803.0056 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-05 03:32:36

Yang–Mills Existence and Mass Gap Concerned by the Theory with Consolidation

Authors: Gaurav Biraris
Comments: 9 Pages.

The theory with consolidation (TWC) published recently offers newer paradigm for theoretical fundamental physics. It has derived the four interactions and quantum existence in geometric manner. Outcomes of TWC address many critical problems in fundamental physics. The problem of Yang-Mills existence and mass gap needs understanding of physical mechanisms in pure mathematical sense. Appreciating Yang-Mills existence in TWC perspective takes us to a step forward towards solution of the problem. Existence of the mass gap and that of QFT is discussed in the article.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2196] viXra:1803.0052 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-04 08:46:09

A Close Look at the Foundation of Quantized Inertia

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In his recent work, physicist Mike McCulloch has derived what he has coined ``Quantized Inertia'' from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. He has published a series of papers indicating that quantized inertia can predict everything from galaxy rotations (without relying on the concept of dark matter) to the EM drive. Clearly, it is an interesting theory that deserves some attention until proven or disproven. We think McCulloch has some excellent insights, but it is important to understand the fundamental principles from which he has derived his theory. We will comment on the derivation in his work and suggest that it possibly could be interpreted from a different perspective. Recent developments in mathematical atomism appear to have revealed new concepts concerning the Planck mass, the Plank length, and their link to special relativity, gravity, and even the Heisenberg principle. We are wondering if Quantized Inertia is compatible with the atomist view of the world and, if so, how should McCulloch's theory be interpreted in that light?
Category: Quantum Physics

[2195] viXra:1803.0048 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 12:17:26

Refutation of the Principle of Superposition of States © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 3 Pages. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

In the argument for the superposition principle, we find all equations are not tautologous. A recent advance used in mathematical logic is disallowing the Equivalent connective of the ℝ real domain when applied to the ℂ complex domain and replacing it with the Imply connective.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2194] viXra:1803.0047 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 13:37:36

Nanophotonics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 39 Pages.

Nanophotonics Researchers have developed a three-dimensional dynamic model of an interaction between light and nanoparticles. [28] Scientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. [27] Physicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2193] viXra:1803.0045 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 16:27:53

Newton's Gravity from Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. An In-Depth Study of the McCulloch Derivation

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 4 Pages.

Mike McCulloch has derived Newton's gravity from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in an innovative and interesting way. Upon deeper examination, we will claim that his work has additional important implications, when viewed from a different perspective. Based on recent developments in mathematical atomism, particularly those exploring the nature of Planck masses and their link to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, we uncover an insight on the quantum world that leads to an even more profound interpretation of the McCulloch derivation than was put forward previously.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2192] viXra:1803.0040 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 06:09:35

New Quantum Particle

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Scientists at Amherst College and Aalto University have created, for the first time a three-dimensional skyrmion in a quantum gas. [38] Using lasers, U.S. and Austrian physicists have coaxed ultracold strontium atoms into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. [37] A team of researchers has now presented this state of matter in the journal Physical Review Letters. The theoretical work was done at TU Wien (Vienna) and Harvard University, the experiment was performed at Rice University in Houston (Texas). [36] The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do—but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2191] viXra:1803.0039 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-03 08:23:41

Frequency-Comb Spectroscopy

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

In a new paper published today in Science Advances, researchers under the direction of Columbia Engineering Professors Michal Lipson and Alexander Gaeta (Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics) have miniaturized dual-frequency combs by putting two frequency comb generators on a single millimeter-sized chip. [36] Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2190] viXra:1803.0038 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 12:26:00

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Collapse at the Planck Scale? Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle Becomes the Certainty Principle

Authors: Espen gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In this paper we show that Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, combined with key principles from Max Planck and Einstein, indicates that uncertainty collapses at the Planck scale. In essence, the uncertainty principle becomes the certainty principle at the Planck scale. This can be used to find the rest-mass formula for elementary particles consistent with what is already known. If this interpretation is correct, it means that Einstein’s intuition that“God Does Not Throw Dice with the Universe” could also be correct. We interpret this to mean that Einstein did not believe the world was ruled by strange uncertainty phenomena at the deeper level, and that level is the Planck scale where all uncertainty seems to collapse. The bad news is that this new-found certainty can only can last for one Planck second!
Category: Quantum Physics

[2189] viXra:1803.0036 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 15:33:34

Atomic Nuclei Modelled Without Magic Particles

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 4 Pages.

Atomic nuclei are normally drawn as a combination of protons and neutrons grouped together as close as possible. Given the enormous repulsive force between two protons such a configuration cannot represent reality. Quantum physics pretends to solve this problem by means of quarks, hold together by gluons. This article presents a model without magic particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2188] viXra:1803.0035 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 15:36:49

Why Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s Atomic Model is Invalid

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 5 Pages.

Outstanding surprisingly the misconception regarding the phenomenon potential energy most likely caused the change from Rutherford-Bohr’s to Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s model.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2187] viXra:1803.0032 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 09:17:58

Quantum Dot Photoemission

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 37 Pages.

Recent research from Kumamoto University in Japan has revealed that polyoxometalates (POMs), typically used for catalysis, electrochemistry, and photochemistry, may also be used in a technique for analyzing quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence (PL) emission mechanisms. [26] Researchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. [25] The world of nanosensors may be physically small, but the demand is large and growing, with little sign of slowing. [24] In a joint research project, scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Technische Universität Berlin (TU) and the University of Rostock have managed for the first time to image free nanoparticles in a laboratory experiment using a highintensity laser source. [23] For the first time, researchers have built a nanolaser that uses only a single molecular layer, placed on a thin silicon beam, which operates at room temperature. [22] A team of engineers at Caltech has discovered how to use computer-chip manufacturing technologies to create the kind of reflective materials that make safety vests, running shoes, and road signs appear shiny in the dark. [21] In the September 23th issue of the Physical Review Letters, Prof. Julien Laurat and his team at Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris (Laboratoire Kastler Brossel-LKB) report that they have realized an efficient mirror consisting of only 2000 atoms. [20] Physicists at MIT have now cooled a gas of potassium atoms to several nanokelvins—just a hair above absolute zero—and trapped the atoms within a two-dimensional sheet of an optical lattice created by crisscrossing lasers. Using a high-resolution microscope, the researchers took images of the cooled atoms residing in the lattice. [19] Researchers have created quantum states of light whose noise level has been " squeezed " to a record low. [18] An elliptical light beam in a nonlinear optical medium pumped by " twisted light " can rotate like an electron around a magnetic field. [17] Physicists from Trinity College Dublin's School of Physics and the CRANN Institute, Trinity College, have discovered a new form of light, which will impact our understanding of the fundamental nature of light. [16] Light from an optical fiber illuminates the metasurface, is scattered in four different directions, and the intensities are measured by the four detectors.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2186] viXra:1803.0031 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-02 10:07:55

Store Time in a Quantum Superposition

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

Computer models of systems such as a city's traffic flow or neural firing in the brain tends to use up a lot of memory. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2185] viXra:1803.0029 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 06:17:58

Three-Qubit System

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2184] viXra:1803.0028 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 06:34:58

Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 61 Pages.

Simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the killer applications of quantum computers. [39] A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2183] viXra:1803.0013 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 11:51:03

Speed Record for Trapped-Ion

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 62 Pages.

Researchers at Oxford University have set a new speed record for the 'logic gates' that form the building blocks of quantum computing-a technology that could transform the way we process information. [40] Simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the killer applications of quantum computers. [39] A new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot-based qubits has been achieved by researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China. [38] This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2182] viXra:1803.0011 [pdf] submitted on 2018-03-01 14:03:14

Refutation of Poincaré Recurrence Theorem © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 2 Pages. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved.

We refute the equation μ⁢(E-An)≤μ⁢(Ao-An)=μ⁢(Ao)-μ⁢(An)=0. Through modification by replacing the Equivalent to connective with the Imply connective, the equation may be coerced into something other than the original. We then ask how experimental quantum results can be reconciled with the refuted Poincaré recurrence theorem. We reply that assuming the so-far non-replicated physical experiment cannot be falsified (such as by probabilistic objections), then those experimental quantum results are obviously misinterpreted into a mistaken conclusion.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2181] viXra:1802.0439 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-28 13:05:19

Rydberg Atoms and Polarons

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Using lasers, U.S. and Austrian physicists have coaxed ultracold strontium atoms into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. [37] A team of researchers has now presented this state of matter in the journal Physical Review Letters. The theoretical work was done at TU Wien (Vienna) and Harvard University, the experiment was performed at Rice University in Houston (Texas). [36] The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do—but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2180] viXra:1802.0429 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-28 05:59:52

Quantum Entangled Beams

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 53 Pages.

A team from the Faculty of Physics, MSU, has developed a method for creating two beams of entangled photons to measure the delay between them. [32] In a new paper, however, physicists Flavio Del Santo at the University of Vienna and Borivoje Dakić at the Austrian Academy of Sciences have shown that, in the quantum world, information can travel in both directions simultaneously—a feature that is forbidden by the laws of classical physics. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2179] viXra:1802.0425 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-28 08:41:05

Light-Manipulation Technologies

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

Researchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2178] viXra:1802.0417 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-27 12:59:31

Laser Attosecond Physics

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. [35] The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact - an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2177] viXra:1802.0406 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-27 07:06:51

Spin Cluster Quantum State

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 27 Pages.

Nuclear techniques at ANSTO have helped to confirm a quantum spin phenomena, a Haldane phase, in a magnetic material, that has potential to be used as a measurement model for quantum computation. [19] Lithium-ion batteries could be under threat after the development of polymer materials by the Universities of Surrey and Bristol, along with Superdielectrics Ltd, that could challenge the dominance of these traditional batteries. [18] Researchers from Umeå University and Linköping University in Sweden have developed light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) that emit strong light at high efficiency. As such, the thin, flexible and lightweight LEC promises future and improved applications within home diagnostics, signage, illumination and healthcare. [17] Physicists from the ATLAS experiment at CERN have found the first direct evidence of high energy light-by-light scattering, a very rare process in which two photons – particles of light – interact and change direction. [16] In materials research, chemistry, biology, and medicine, chemical bonds, and especially their dynamic behavior, determine the properties of a system. These can be examined very closely using terahertz radiation and short pulses. [15] An international collaborative of scientists has devised a method to control the number of optical solitons in microresonators, which underlie modern photonics. [14] Solitary waves called solitons are one of nature's great curiosities: Unlike other waves, these lone wolf waves keep their energy and shape as they travel, instead of dissipating or dispersing as most other waves do. In a new paper in Physical Review Letters (PRL), a team of mathematicians, physicists and engineers tackles a famous, 50-year-old problem tied to these enigmatic entities. [13] Theoretical physicists studying the behavior of ultra-cold atoms have discovered a new source of friction, dispensing with a century-old paradox in the process. Their prediction, which experimenters may soon try to verify, was reported recently in Physical Review Letters. [12] Solitons are localized wave disturbances that propagate without changing shape, a result of a nonlinear interaction that compensates for wave packet dispersion. Individual solitons may collide, but a defining feature is that they pass through one another and emerge from the collision unaltered in shape, amplitude, or velocity, but with a new trajectory reflecting a discontinuous jump.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2176] viXra:1802.0404 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-27 07:45:26

Super-Resolution Microscopy in Time

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 58 Pages.

The unique platform, which is referred as a 4-D microscope, combines the sensitivity and high time-resolution of phase imaging with the specificity and high spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. [34] The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact - an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing. [27] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2175] viXra:1802.0401 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-27 08:54:55

Remarks on Bell's Inequality

Authors: Zhengjun Cao, Lihua Liu
Comments: 10 Pages.

Quantum entanglement is of great importance to quantum cryptography and computation. So far, all experimental demonstrations of entanglement are designed to check Bell's inequality which is based on Bell's formulation for EPR paradox. In this note, we specify the assumptions needed in Bell's mathematical argument. We then show the contradictions among these assumptions. As a result, it becomes very easy to see that Bell's inequality is trivial.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2174] viXra:1802.0400 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-27 09:11:17

Chip-to-Chip Communication

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 59 Pages.

This has the double benefit of potentially allowing a new method of chip-to-chip communication with silicon, currently only possible with much more expensive materials, but also pushing mobile communications to much higher frequency and allowing the transmission of more data. [37] Based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (COMS) technology—a standard low-cost, high-volume chip manufacturing technique used for most processors and chips today—a group of researchers from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, together with a consortium working under the EU-funded project "ADDAPT," have demonstrated a novel optical receiver (RX) that can achieve an aggregate bandwidth of 160 Gb/s through four optical fibers. [36] An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2173] viXra:1802.0369 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-26 05:56:55

Rydberg Polarons in a Bose Gas

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 60 Pages.

A team of researchers has now presented this state of matter in the journal Physical Review Letters. The theoretical work was done at TU Wien (Vienna) and Harvard University, the experiment was performed at Rice University in Houston (Texas). [36] The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do—but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2172] viXra:1802.0367 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-26 07:27:19

High Speed Distance Measurement

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

The experiment relied on a soliton frequency comb generated in a chip-based optical microresonator made from silicon nitride. [33] This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2171] viXra:1802.0365 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-26 09:22:52

Two-Way Quantum Signaling

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 51 Pages.

In a new paper, however, physicists Flavio Del Santo at the University of Vienna and Borivoje Dakić at the Austrian Academy of Sciences have shown that, in the quantum world, information can travel in both directions simultaneously—a feature that is forbidden by the laws of classical physics. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23] A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research. [22]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2170] viXra:1802.0344 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-24 08:33:09

Connection Between Planck’s Relation and Non-Existence of Medium for Light Propagation and Predetermination of Photon and Electron Interference Patterns in Double-Slit Experiments

Authors: Henok Tadesse
Comments: 21 Pages.

The puzzles of quantum mechanics are: 1. What is the medium for the photon and for the electron wave? i.e. what is waving? 2. How can a particle have an interference pattern 3. Observer effect. 4. Entanglement. In Quantum Erasure and Double-Slit experiments, how does the emitter know to direct the photon two both slits or only to one slit? And how does the detector know where to detect the photons to form an interference pattern and not a bell-shaped (Gaussian) pattern or vice versa? This paper proposes that the hint in the mystery of light waves without a medium (ether) is contained in the Planck’s relation itself: E = hf. It is shown that Planck’s relation itself hints on the mystery of light waves without medium, and is a consequence or manifestation of non-existence of a medium for light propagation. The subtle law of nature that has eluded physicists so far is that the photon energy density ( amplitude of electric and magnetic fields) at a given point in the spatial dimensions of the photon is directly related to the rate of change of the electric and magnetic fields at that point. The higher the frequency of the photon, the higher the rate of change of the fields at every point for that photon, compared to a photon of lower frequency. The higher the rate of change of the fields at a given point, the higher the amplitude of oscillation of the electric and magnetic fields at that point. It follows that the higher the frequency of the photon and the higher the amplitude of the electric and magnetic fields, which results in high intensity of vibration of the photon, the more localized it will be. A high frequency photon will spread less in space than a lower frequency photon of equal envelope amplitude because, if the high frequency photon spreads out, there would be high rates of change over a wider region of space, and the total energy would be greater than the finite photon energy. The photon energy will always be concentrated at regions of high rate of change of electric and magnetic fields. This theory explains how electric and magnetic fields can be their own ‘medium’ , 'dragging' of the electromagnetic energy by the wave, hence eliminating the need for any medium. Since the electromagnetic wave (the photon) is a traveling disturbance of electric and magnetic fields, the rate of change of the fields at a point in space will create the intensity (amplitude) of the fields at that point. Likewise, the electron wave is a travelling disturbance of the electron mass density wave on the electron ‘sea’. The higher the frequency of mass density variation of the electron at a given point of space, the higher the mass density of the electron at that point. This will make the electron ( the electron ‘sea’) its own medium of propagation. i.e. the electron ‘sea’ is the medium of propagation for the electron wave. This means that the electron wave 'drags' the electron with itself. The other theory proposed in this paper is the predetermination of interference fringes in double-slit experiments and predetermination of which slit the photon takes in which-way or quantum erasure experiments. We propose a fundamental law of nature that an electron, an atom or any source of electromagnetic waves will always emit a weak, continuous electromagnetic energy even when not excited, which implies that electrons and atoms are always in continuous, fundamental, weak vibrations (accelerations). Therefore, in double-slit experiments and in quantum erasure or which-way experiments, the atom (electron) of the light source is always emitting weak, continuous electromagnetic waves, even before the atom is excited. Therefore, even before the atom/the electron of the light source starts emitting a photon, a weak electromagnetic (light) wave exists as an entity, extending all the way from the light source (the atom) to the slits and to the detecting screen. This ‘precursor’ wave serves as the 'highway' for the propagation of the main photon energy packet, both of which are coherent and exist as an entity. When the atom is excited, it will just emit a photon that is coherent with the weak wave it had already been emitting continuously. Therefore, even before the atom is excited, a weak wave interference pattern already exists on the screen. The photon emitted after excitation simply follows the path already created by the weak ‘precursor’ wave and will land on the screen according to the predetermined interference pattern, collapsing to the point of detection at the instant of detection. The path to be taken by the photon is predetermined in which-way or quantum erasure experiments. The same theory explains quantum entanglement: the polarization of two entangled photons is predetermined even before the excitation of the atoms emitting the photons.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2169] viXra:1802.0343 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-24 08:53:04

Turn Light Upside Down

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 54 Pages.

This scientific achievement toward more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. [32] It may seem like such optical behavior would require bending the rules of physics, but in fact, scientists at MIT, Harvard University, and elsewhere have now demonstrated that photons can indeed be made to interact-an accomplishment that could open a path toward using photons in quantum computing, if not in light sabers. [31] Optical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24] Topological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. [23]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2168] viXra:1802.0340 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-23 14:44:08

Two Photon Composite Electron Model: QFT Aspects

Authors: DT Froedge
Comments: 20 Pages. This paper presents the first explanarion of charge.

In a previous paper “A Physical Electron-Positron Model”[1] an electron model was developed in a geometrical algebra (GA) construct developed by Doran et.al. [2] The model shows the mathematical structure, and the physical description required for the existence of a composite electron but not delineating the physical processes. This paper will develop the model from the perspective of classical and QM mechanics and make the connection to the QFT and Lorentz structure that underlies the physical basis, and illustrates how the interaction of photons can create charge. The path integral formulations of QFT fit well with the model and it is absent the infinities indicative of the standard model. The concept of charge has heretofore not had any theoretical explanation, accept for some unknown substance sprinkling in with the mass. The model therefore offers the QFT community an idea on how to convert the concept of Charge and Pair Production from magic to mechanics.
Category: Quantum Physics

[2167] viXra:1802.0334 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-23 07:40:52

Fluctuation Theorems Validation

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 55 Pages.

Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2166] viXra:1802.0333 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-23 08:12:14

Isolated Quantum Many-Body System

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

The old question, whether quantum systems show recurrences, can finally be answered: Yes, they do—but the concept of recurrence has to be slightly redefined. [35] Researchers at Purdue University have performed the first experimental tests of several fundamental theorems in thermodynamics, verifying the relationship between them and providing a better understanding of how nanoparticles behave under fluctuation. [34] Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. [33] A team of researchers from several institutions in Japan has described a physical system that can be described as existing above "absolute hot" and also below absolute zero. [32] A silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2165] viXra:1802.0332 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-23 08:30:30

Reliable Quantum Computers

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 57 Pages.

An international team of researchers has taken an important step towards solving a difficult variation of this problem, using a statistical approach developed at the University of Freiburg. [35] Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25]
Category: Quantum Physics

[2164] viXra:1802.0318 [pdf] submitted on 2018-02-22 09:48:18

Quantum Memory for Hours

Authors: George Rajna
Comments: 56 Pages.

Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. [34] Electronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. [33] A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated a new method for splitting light beams into their frequency modes. [32] Quantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". [31] Researchers at the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs have demonstrated a new type of silicon chip that can help building and testing quantum computers and could find their way into your mobile phone to secure information. [30] Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. [29] Particle physicists are studying ways to harness the power of the quantum realm to further their research. [28] A collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing. [27] A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. [26] The search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. [25] A research team from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation. [24]
Category: Quantum Physics

Replacements of recent Submissions

[1020] viXra:1806.0119 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-10 08:19:45

The Pauli Objection Addressed in a Logical Way

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

One of the greatest unsolved problems in quantum mechanics is related to time operators. Since the Pauli objection was first raised in 1933, time has only been considered a parameter in quantum mechanics and not as an operator. The Pauli objection basically asserts that a time operator must be Hermitian and self-adjoint, something the Pauli objection points out is actually not possible. Some theorists have gone so far as to claim that time between events does not exist in the quantum world. Others have explored various ideas to establish an acceptable type of time operator, such as a dynamic time operator, or an external clock that stands just outside the framework of the Pauli objection. However, none of these methods seem to be completely sound. We think that a better approach is to develop a deeper understanding of how elementary particles can be seen, themselves, as ticking clocks, and to examine more broadly how they relate to time.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1019] viXra:1805.0393 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-30 06:14:33

Pendulum Represents Binary Quantum State of Oscillations

Authors: Masataka Ohta
Comments: 2 Pages.

There is a straightforward correspondence between superposition of polarization modes of photons and that of classical radio waves. While classical particles cannot be superpositioned, classical waves can be, which is within classical intuition. Even more intuitively, two dimensional oscillations of a pendulum represent oscillating binary quantum state such as polarization state of photons.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1018] viXra:1805.0392 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-31 20:23:04

Qubit as a Polarization Division Multiplexed Quadrature Amplitude Modulated Symbol of Light

Authors: Masataka Ohta
Comments: 5 Pages.

With optical communication technology today, it is practical to communicate with polarization division multiplexed (PDM) quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) symbols, which are quantum superposition of horizontally and vertically polarized photons, which are, so called, qubits. As the number of bits encoded by a PDM QAM symbol is limited, according to Shannon-Hartley theorem, by signal to noise ratio, the degree of parallelism of quantum computers is limited. The result is consistent with quantum threshold theorem. Quantum entanglement between qubits only makes the number of bits encoded by the qubits smaller, because entanglement means correlation between the qubits. Thus, quantum computers are not more powerful than classical ones. Finally, it is shown that purely classical computers can be arbitrarily fast and ideal, that is, noiseless, quantum computers are classical.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1017] viXra:1805.0292 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-17 15:15:00

Revisiting the Derivation of Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle: The Collapse of Uncertainty at the Planck Scale

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 15 Pages.

In this paper, we will revisit the derivation of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. We will see how the Heisenberg principle collapses at the Planck scale by introducing a minor modification. The beauty of our suggested modification is that it does not change the main equations in quantum mechanics; it only gives them a Planck scale limit where uncertainty collapses. We suspect that Einstein could have been right after all, when he stated, “God does not throw dice.” His now-famous saying was an expression of his skepticism towards the concept that quantum randomness could be the ruling force, even at the deepest levels of reality. Here we will explore the quantum realm with a fresh perspective, by re-deriving the Heisenberg principle in relation to the Planck scale. Our modified theory indicates that renormalization is no longer needed. Further, Bell’s Inequality no longer holds, as the breakdown of Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle at the Planck scale opens up the possibility for hidden variable theories. The theory also suggests that the superposition principle collapses at the Planck scale. Further, we show how this idea leads to an upper boundary on uncertainty, in addition to the lower boundary. These upper and lower boundaries are identical for the Planck mass particle; in fact, they are zero, and this highlights the truly unique nature of the Planck mass particle.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1016] viXra:1805.0072 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-14 12:27:00

Photons: Explained and Derived by Energy Wave Equations

Authors: Jeff Yee
Comments: 22 pages

The photon is demystified in energy wave theory as a transverse wave packet of energy, resulting from the vibration of particles that are responding to waves that naturally travel the universe. In earlier works in the theory, the photon was accurately modeled mathematically with the same wave properties that govern the creation of particles and their forces. In this paper, the photon’s behavior is further explained to match various photon experiments, describing the mechanism for the creation and absorption of transverse waves.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1015] viXra:1805.0072 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-06 21:50:41

Photons: Explained and Derived by Energy Wave Equations

Authors: Jeff Yee
Comments: 22 pages

The photon is demystified in energy wave theory as a transverse wave packet of energy, resulting from the vibration of particles that are responding to waves that naturally travel the universe. In earlier works in the theory, the photon was accurately modeled mathematically with the same wave properties that govern the creation of particles and their forces. In this paper, the photon’s behavior is further explained to match various photon experiments, describing the mechanism for the creation and absorption of transverse waves.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1014] viXra:1804.0379 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-28 10:48:16

Modularity in the Universe

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. This belongs to the Hilbert Book Model Project

All massive objects in the universe behave as modules. All modules are recurrently regenerated by private stochastic processes. These processes install the coherence of the module and control the binding of components in composed modules.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1013] viXra:1804.0302 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-01 07:06:29

Explanation of Quantum Entanglement Using Hidden Variables

Authors: Jesús Sánchez
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this paper, it will be explained the quantum entanglement using hidden variables. This means, with no need of immediate or infinity range interactions. For this, the solution would be to take into account also the measurement device hidden variables. These hidden variables of the measurement device will cause that the detection of the particles to be measured, can only be made at certain moments, places and orientations that correspond when the particle states have specific values. This means, the particle state can be changing over time, but the measurement equipment can only detect it when it has certain values (because the hidden values of the measurement equipment are also participating in the process). So, the measurement device is participating indirectly in the entanglement of the particles. The problem until now with hidden variables interpretation was that only the hidden variables of the particles were taken into account. But, once the measurement device hidden variables status is considered also, the issue can be solved.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1012] viXra:1804.0285 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-21 05:53:40

The Emergence of Spatio-Temporal Certainty (1+2+3)

Authors: V. A. Kasimov.
Comments: 27 Pages. Язык: русский

The well - known philosophical formula: "Space and time are universal forms of existence of matter" forces us to introduce several levels of representation of our knowledge about space-time relations, which we will conditionally call "levels of ontologization" of our understanding of these relations. These levels can be considered as ontological sections in the process of cognition of the essence of spatiotemporal relations and the formation of their conceptual certainty. A simple example is used to model the process of formation of spatiotemporal certainty in the Leibniz aspect: the transition from the quantum level (micro) to the level of classical mechanics (macro). In this regard, we can talk about the two-phase existence of matter. In addition, an attempt was made to outline the solution of space-time problems after work: "Contextuality of one particle, nonlocality of two particles, entanglement, Wheeler's experiments with delay of choice, FWT and so on ..."[12]. The current situation of the search for the essence of space-time relations resembles the early history of the search for the essence of "phlogiston", which was resolved by the statistical theory of Gibbs ensembles, the definition of thermodynamic concepts and, in particular, the concept of temperature as the average kinetic energy of the ensemble. It is quite possible that the spatiotemporal relations are also some averages from the eigenvalues of the quantum object operators.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1011] viXra:1804.0148 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-23 08:16:30

Coincidence and Non-coincidence Using Optical Circulators

Authors: M. W. Roberts
Comments: 12 Pages.

An optical experiment is described in which pairs of quantum entangled photons are sent into separate optical circulators. Theoretical analysis is used to predict the number of coincident detections between these photons at the output from the circulators. With proper control of non-local, two-photon interference, the photon pairs can be put in perfect coincidence or in perfect non-coincidence, as selected by the experimenter. These results contradict the predictions made using classical probability analysis.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1010] viXra:1804.0116 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-10 15:01:33

Wave-Particle Duality Paradox is Solved Using Mutual Energy and Self-Energy Principles for Electromagnetic Field and Photon

Authors: Shuang-Ren Zhao
Comments: 107 Pages.

The particle and wave duality is solved through the self-energy and the mutual energy principles. Welch has introduced the time-domain reciprocity theorem in 1960. This author have introduced the mutual energy theorem in 1987. It has been proved that the above two theorems are same theorem in time-domain or in Fourier domain. This author believe there is an energy flow from transmitting antenna to the receiving antenna. Hence this theorem is a energy theorem instead of a mathematical theorem i.e. the reciprocity theorem. This author found that the mutual energy is the additional energy when the two waves are superposed comparing to the situation when the two waves alone stayed in the space. It is often asked that if the two waves are identical what is the energy after the two waves are superposed, 4 or 2 times? this author's answer are 2 or 4 depending whether the sources of the waves are involved or not. However this author noticed that a more important situation, which is the superposition of two waves: one is retarded wave sent from the emitter, another is the advanced wave sent from the absorber. This situation actually described the photon. This author have found that, instead there are two photons the retarded photon and the advanced photon like some author believed, there is only one photon. The reason is that the two waves the retarded wave and the advanced wave they both bring one photon energy, which are sent to the space, but these energy are returned with the time-reversed waves. The additional energy because of the superpose process of the two waves is just with 1 photon's energy instead of 2 photon's energy. This energy is sent from the emitter to the absorber. These build this author's photon model. This photon model is proved by this author through the notice of the conflict between the energy conservation and both the superposition principle and the Maxwell equations for single charge. This conflict force this author introduced the mutual energy principle and the self-energy principle. Self-energy principle tell us the self-energy (the wave's energy before superposed) time-reversal return to its source and hence do not transfer any energy from emitter to the absorber. The mutual energy principle tell us that transferring the energy from the emitter to the absorber is only done by the mutual energy flow. This author also proved that the mutual energy flow theorem, which says that the energy transferred by mutual energy flow is equal in any surface between the emitter to the absorber. The wave function collapse process is explained by the two processes together the first is the self-energy time-reversal return to their sources (instead of the targets), the second is that the mutual energy flow brings a photon's energy package from emitter to the absorber. The wave's probability property is also explained that because only when a retarded wave synchronized with an advanced wave the energy can be transferred. The photon energy is transferred only when the retarded wave (one of solution of Maxwell equations) and the advanced wave (another solution of the Maxwell equations) are synchronized, otherwise the two waves are returned by two time-reversal waves. Time-reversal wave are not satisfy Maxwell equations but satisfy the time-reversal Maxwell equations. Hence, 4 time-reversal Maxwell equations which describe the two additional time-reversal waves are added to Maxwell equations. Hence, the photon's package wave is consist of 4 waves which are corresponding to 4 self-energy flows. There are two additional energy flows, which are the mutual energy flows that is responsible for transferring the energy from emitter to the absorber. The time-reversal mutual energy flow which is responsible to bring the energy back from the absorber to the emitter if the absorber only obtained a half photon or a part of photon.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1009] viXra:1804.0116 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-28 11:23:08

Wave-Particle Duality Paradox is Solved Using Mutual Energy and Self-Energy Principles for Electromagnetic Field and Photon

Authors: Shuang-Ren Zhao
Comments: 99 Pages.

Abstract The particle and wave duality is solved through the self-energy and the mutual energy principles. Welch has introduced the time-domain reciprocity theorem in 1960. The author have introduced the mutual energy theorem in 1987. It has been proved that the above two theorems are same theorem in time-domain or in Fourier domain. The author believe there is an energy flow from transmitting antenna to the receiving antenna. Hence this theorem is a energy theorem instead of a mathematical theorem i.e. the reciprocity theorem. The author found that the mutual energy is the additional energy when the two waves are superposed comparing to the situation when the two waves alone stayed in the space. It is often asked that if the two waves are identical what is the energy after the two waves are superposed, 4 or 2 times? The author's answer are 2 or 4 depending whether the sources of the waves are involved or not. However the author noticed that a more important situation, which is the superposition of two waves: one is retarded wave sent from the emitter, another is the advanced wave sent from the absorber. This situation actually described the photon. The author have found that, instead there are two photons the retarded photon and the advanced photon like some author believed, there is only one photon. The reason is that the two waves the retarded wave and the advanced wave they both bring one photon energy are sent to the space, but these energy are returned with the time-reversed waves. The additional energy because of the superpose process of the two waves is just with 1 photon's energy instead of 2 photon's energy. This energy is sent from the emitter to the absorber. These build the author's photon model. This photon model is proved by the author through the notice of the conflict between the energy conservation and both the superposition principle and the Maxwell equations for single charge. This conflict force the author introduced the mutual energy principle and the self-energy principle. Self-energy principle tell us the self-energy (the wave's energy before superposed) time-reversal return to its source and hence do not transfer any energy from emitter to the absorber. The mutual energy principle tell us that transferring the energy from the emitter to the absorber is only done by the mutual energy flow. The author also proved that the mutual energy flow theorem, which says that the energy transferred by mutual energy flow is equal in any surface between the emitter to the absorber. The wave function collapse process is explained by the two processes together the first is the self-energy time-reversal return to their sources (instead of the targets), the second is that the mutual energy flow brings a photon's energy package from emitter to the absorber. The wave's probability property is also explained that because only when a retarded wave synchronized with an advanced wave the energy can be transferred. The photon energy is transferred only when the retarded wave (one of solution of Maxwell equations) and the advanced wave (another solution of the Maxwell equations) are synchronized, otherwise the two waves are returned by two time-reversal waves. Time-reversal wave are not satisfy Maxwell equations but satisfy the time-reversal Maxwell equations. Hence, 4 time-reversal Maxwell equations which describe the two additional time-reversal waves are added to Maxwell equations. Hence, the photon's package wave is consist of 4 waves which are corresponding to 4 self-energy flows. There are two additional energy flows, which are the mutual energy flows that is responsible for transferring the energy from emitter to the absorber. The time-reversal mutual energy flow which is responsible to bring the energy back from the emitter to the absorber if the absorber only obtained a half photon.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1008] viXra:1803.0665 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-14 03:23:59

Dealing with Optical Fibers in General Relativity

Authors: Ll. Bel
Comments: 5 Pages. Errata and minor errors correctrd

An example of how optical fibers can clarify the influence of a gravitational field on the propagation of light.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1007] viXra:1803.0655 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-01 03:32:10

Heisenberg Quantum Probabilities Leads to a Quantum Gravity Theory

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 12 Pages.

In this paper we suggest that through working with the Planck mass and its link to other particles in a simple way, it possible to “convert” the Heisenberg uncertainty principle into a very simple quantum probabilistic model. We further combine this with key elements from special relativity theory and get an interesting quantum relativistic probability theory. Some of the key points presented here could help to eliminate negative and above unity (pseudo) probabilities that often are used in standard quantum mechanics. These fake probabilities may be rooted in a failure to understand the Heisenberg principle fully in relation to the Planck mass. When properly understood, the Heisenberg principle seems to give a probabilistic range of quantum probabilities that is sound. There are no instantaneous probabilities and the maximum probability is always unity. In our formulation, the Planck mass particle is always related to a probability of one. Thus, we have certainty at the Planck scale for the Planck mass particle, or for particles accelerated to reach Planck energy. We are also presenting a relativistic extension of the McCulloch Heisenberg-derived Newton equivalent gravity theory. Our relativistic version requires much less mass than the Newtonian theory to explain gravitational phenomena, and initial investigation indicates it is consistent with perihelion of Mercury.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1006] viXra:1803.0655 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-27 11:54:00

Heisenberg Quantum Probabilities. God Does Not Throw Dice at the Planck Scale, but Below

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 9 Pages.

In this paper we suggest that working with the Planck mass and its link to other particles in a simple way, it possible to ``convert" the Heisenberg uncertainty principle into a very simple quantum probabilistic model. We further combine this with key elements from special relativity theory and get an interesting quantum relativistic probability theory. Some of the key points presented here could help to eliminate negative and above unity (pseudo) probabilities that often are used in standard quantum mechanics. These fake probabilities may be rooted in a failure to understand the Heisenberg principle fully in relation to the Planck mass. When properly understood, the Heisenberg principle seems to give a probabilistic range of quantum probabilities that is sound. There are no instantaneous probabilities and the maximum probability is always unity. In our formulation, the Planck mass particle is always related to a probability of one. Thus, we have certainty at the Planck scale for the Planck mass particle, or for particles accelerated to reach Planck energy.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1005] viXra:1803.0655 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-26 16:08:49

Heisenberg Quantum Probabilities. God Does Not Throw Dice at the Planck Scale, but Below!

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 9 Pages.

In this paper we suggest that working with the Planck mass and its link to other particles in a simple way, it possible to ``convert" the Heisenberg uncertainty principle into a very simple quantum probabilistic model. We further combine this with key elements from special relativity theory and get an interesting quantum relativistic probability theory. Some of the key points presented here could help to eliminate negative and above unity (pseudo) probabilities that often are used in standard quantum mechanics. These fake probabilities may be rooted in a failure to understand the Heisenberg principle fully in relation to the Planck mass. When properly understood, the Heisenberg principle seems to give a probabilistic range of quantum probabilities that is sound. There are no instantaneous probabilities and the maximum probability is always unity. In our formulation, the Planck mass particle is always related to a probability of one. Thus, we have certainty at the Planck scale for the Planck mass particle, or for particles accelerated to reach Planck energy.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1004] viXra:1803.0395 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-15 11:49:58

Massa uit het Niets

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 2 Pages. Dit behoort bij het Hilbert Book Model project

Massa blijkt een vluchtige eigenschap te zijn die uit het niets lijkt voort te komen en snel verwatert in het toenemende volume van het universum
Category: Quantum Physics

[1003] viXra:1803.0388 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-04 12:06:15

Generating Mass from Nothing

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. This belongs to the Hilbert Book Model Project

Having mass stands for having the capability to deform the living space of the owner of the mass. This description makes mass a very transient property that recurrently must be regenerated because deformations spread over the living space. Consequently, deformations quickly fade away. It looks as if mass generates out of nothing and then dilutes into nothing. Due to their simple structure, the generation of electrons encounters little problems. This enables the computation of the generation rate of their constituents.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1002] viXra:1803.0388 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-02 02:03:26

Generating Mass from Nothing

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. This belongs to the Hilbert Book Model Project

Having mass stands for having the capability to deform the living space of the owner of the mass. This description makes mass a very transient property that recurrently must be regenerated because deformations spread over the living space. Consequently, deformations quickly fade away. It looks as if mass generates out of nothing and then dilutes into nothing. Due to their simple structure, the generation of electrons encounters little problems. This enables the computation of the generation rate of their constituents.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1001] viXra:1803.0388 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-31 07:14:34

Generating Mass from Nothing

Authors: J.A.J. van Leunen
Comments: 3 Pages. This belongs to the Hilbert Book Model Project

Having mass stands for having the capability to deform the living space of the owner of the mass. This description makes mass a very transient property that recurrently must be regenerated because deformations spread over the living space. Consequently, deformations quickly fade away. It looks as if mass generates out of nothing and then dilutes into nothing.
Category: Quantum Physics

[1000] viXra:1803.0292 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-26 15:03:24

Waves Generate Electrons and Both Are Quantized Into Phosons (New Difinition of Reltivistic Mass and Failure of De Broglie Theory)

Authors: Yaseen Ali Mohamed Al Azzam
Comments: 21 Pages.

Waves generate electrons and both are quantized into fundamental units of mass called phosons. paper includes a model for waves' particles and new difinition of relativistic mass and how phosons generate the electron and shape it. Als, how De Broglie theory fails to describe the wave behavior of matter.
Category: Quantum Physics

[999] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-07 05:24:07

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 17 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe.
Category: Quantum Physics

[998] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-27 02:12:53

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 15 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe.
Category: Quantum Physics

[997] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-03 14:27:58

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 15 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe.
Category: Quantum Physics

[996] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-21 16:19:46

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 12 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe.
Category: Quantum Physics

[995] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-20 14:57:47

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 12 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics \cite{Hau14,Hau2016n}. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein's special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincare synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined ``time-speed" and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe. This is a first draft that we plan to develop into a longer paper later on. Thus we are laying out the most important key concepts and more detailed description will be provided in future versions of the paper. Constructive comments are welcome.
Category: Quantum Physics

[994] viXra:1803.0271 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-19 09:35:49

The Mystery of Mass as Understood from Atomism

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 11 Pages.

Over the past few years I have presented a theory of modern atomism supported by mathematics [1, 2]. In each area of analysis undertaken in this work, the theory leads to the same mathematical end results as Einstein’s special relativity theory when using Einstein-Poincar ́e synchronized clocks. In addition, atomism is grounded in a form of quantization that leads to upper boundary limits on a long series of results in physics, where the upper boundary limits traditionally have led to infinity challenges. In 2014, I introduced a new concept that I coined “time-speed” and showed that this was a way to distinguish mass from energy. Mass can be seen as time-speed and energy as speed. Mass can also be expressed in the normal way in form of kg (or pounds) and in this paper we will show how kg is linked to time-speed. Actually, there are a number of ways to describe mass, and when they are used consistently, they each give the same result. However, modern physics still does not seem to understand what mass truly is. This paper is mainly aimed at readers who have already spent some time studying my mathematical atomism theory. Atomism seems to offer a key to understanding mass and energy at a deeper level than modern physics has attained to date. Modern physics is mostly a top-down theory, while atomism is a bottom-up theory. Atomism starts with the depth of reality and surprisingly this leads to predictions that fit what we can observe. This is a first draft that we plan to develop into a longer paper later on. Thus we are laying out the most important key concepts and more detailed description will be provided in future versions of the paper. Constructive comments are welcome.
Category: Quantum Physics

[993] viXra:1803.0262 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-22 04:41:26

Double Slit Experiment

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 2 Pages.

The double slit experiment has a measurement problem, physicists believe that the results are magical but they are not. They don't realize that there is a hidden element in that experiment, those interference waves are not created by the particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[992] viXra:1803.0262 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-20 12:32:13

Double Slit Experiment

Authors: Peter V. Raktoe
Comments: 3 Pages.

The double slit experiment has a measurement problem, physicists believe that the results are magical but they are not. They don't realize that there is a hidden element in that experiment, that interference pattern is not caused by the particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[991] viXra:1803.0201 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-27 05:50:10

Refutation of the Pauli Exclusion Principle © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All Rights Reserved.

Authors: Colin James III
Comments: 1 Page. © Copyright 2018 by Colin James III All rights reserved. info@cec-services dot com

The generalized and specific forms of the Pauli exclusion principle are separately not tautologous and jointly not equivalent. A weakening of the argument by using the implication connective fails.
Category: Quantum Physics

[990] viXra:1803.0151 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-18 13:46:53

A Speculative Relationship Between the Proton Mass, the Proton Radius, and the Fine Structure Constant and Between the Fine Structure Constant and the Hagedorn Temperature

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this short note we present a possible connection between the proton radius and the proton mass using the fine structure constant. The Hagedorn temperature is related to the energy levels assumed to be required to free the quarks from the proton, where hadronic matter is unstable. We also speculate that there could be a connection between the Hagedorn temperature and the Planck temperature through the fine structure constant. Whether there is something to this, or it is purely a coincidence, we will leave to others and future research to explore. However, we think these possible relationships are worth further investigation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[989] viXra:1803.0151 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-12 06:04:52

A Speculative Relationship Between the Proton Mass, the Proton Radius, and the Fine Structure Constant and Between the Fine Structure Constant and the Hagedorn Temperature

Authors: Espen Garder Haug
Comments: 3 Pages.

In this short note we present a possible connection between the proton radius and the proton mass using the fine structure constant. The Hagedorn temperature is related to the energy levels assumed to be required to free the quarks from the proton, where hadronic matter is unstable. We also speculate that there could be a connection between the Hagedorn temperature and the Planck temperature through the fine structure constant. Whether there is something to this, or it is purely a coincidence, we will leave to others and future research to explore. However, we think these possible relationships are worth further investigation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[988] viXra:1803.0052 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-05 02:35:08

A Close Look at the Foundation of Quantized Inertia

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In his recent work, physicist Mike McCulloch has derived what he has coined ``Quantized Inertia'' from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. He has published a series of papers indicating that quantized inertia can predict everything from galaxy rotations (without relying on the concept of dark matter) to the EM drive. Clearly, it is an interesting theory that deserves some attention until proven or disproven. We think McCulloch has some excellent insights, but it is important to understand the fundamental principles from which he has derived his theory. We will comment on the derivation in his work and suggest that it possibly could be interpreted from a different perspective. Recent developments in mathematical atomism appear to have revealed new concepts concerning the Planck mass, the Plank length, and their link to special relativity, gravity, and even the Heisenberg principle. We are wondering if Quantized Inertia is compatible with the atomist view of the world and, if so, how should McCulloch's theory be interpreted in that light?
Category: Quantum Physics

[987] viXra:1803.0045 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-05 03:05:46

Newton's Gravity from Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle. An In-Depth Study of the McCulloch Derivation

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

Mike McCulloch has derived Newton's gravity from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in an innovative and interesting way. Upon deeper examination, we will claim that his work has additional important implications, when viewed from a different perspective. Based on recent developments in mathematical atomism, particularly those exploring the nature of Planck masses and their link to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, we uncover an insight on the quantum world that leads to an even more profound interpretation of the McCulloch derivation than was put forward previously.
Category: Quantum Physics

[986] viXra:1803.0038 [pdf] replaced on 2018-06-07 06:22:57

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Collapse at the Planck Scale? Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle Becomes the Certainty Principle

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In this paper we show that Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, combined with key principles from Max Planck and Einstein, indicates that uncertainty collapses at the Planck scale. In essence we suggest that the uncertainty principle becomes the certainty principle at the Planck scale. This can be used to find the rest-mass formula for elementary particles consistent with what is already known. If this interpretation is correct, it means that Einstein’s intuition that “God Does Not Throw Dice with the Universe” could also be correct. We interpret this to mean that Einstein did not believe the world was ruled by strange uncertainty phenomena at the deeper level, and we will claim that this level is the Planck scale, where all uncertainty seems to collapse. The bad news is that this new-found certainty can only can last for one Planck second! We are also questioning, without coming to a conclusion, if this could have implications for Bell’s theorem and hidden variable theories.
Category: Quantum Physics

[985] viXra:1803.0038 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-05 04:49:44

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Collapse at the Planck Scale? Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle Becomes the Certainty Principle

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 5 Pages.

In this paper we show that Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, combined with key principles from Max Planck and Einstein, indicates that uncertainty collapses at the Planck scale. In essence, the uncertainty principle becomes the certainty principle at the Planck scale. This can be used to find the rest-mass formula for elementary particles consistent with what is already known. If this interpretation is correct, it means that Einstein’s intuition that “God Does Not Throw Dice with the Universe” could also be correct. We interpret this to mean that Einstein did not believe the world was ruled by strange uncertainty phenomena at the deeper level, and we will claim that this level is the Planck scale where all uncertainty seems to collapse. The bad news is that this new-found certainty can only can last for one Planck second!
Category: Quantum Physics

[984] viXra:1803.0038 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-04 08:02:18

Does Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Collapse at the Planck Scale? Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle Becomes the Certainty Principle

Authors: Espen Gaarder Haug
Comments: 6 Pages.

In this paper we show that Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, combined with key principles from Max Planck and Einstein, indicates that uncertainty collapses at the Planck scale. In essence, the uncertainty principle becomes the certainty principle at the Planck scale. This can be used to find the rest-mass formula for elementary particles consistent with what is already known. If this interpretation is correct, it means that Einstein’s intuition that “God Does Not Throw Dice with the Universe” could also be correct. We interpret this to mean that Einstein did not believe the world was ruled by strange uncertainty phenomena at the deeper level, and we will claim that this level is the Planck scale where all uncertainty seems to collapse. The bad news is that this new-found certainty can only can last for one Planck second!
Category: Quantum Physics

[983] viXra:1803.0036 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-23 04:09:01

Atomic Nuclei Modelled Without Exotic Particles and Magic Forces

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 13 Pages. Version 3 is an extension of the model presented in version 2 and shows interesting similarities with publicly presented potential energy density values of uranium and hydrogen

Atomic nuclei are normally drawn as a combination of protons and neutrons grouped together as close as possible. Given the enormous repulsive force between two protons such a configuration cannot represent reality. Quantum physics pretends to solve this problem by means of quarks, held together by gluons. This article presents a model without such particles and forces.
Category: Quantum Physics

[982] viXra:1803.0036 [pdf] replaced on 2018-03-28 04:33:20

Atomic Nuclei Modelled Without Magic Particles

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 6 Pages. Version 2 shows frequencies of EM radiations obtained with the presented model of an atomic nucleus.

Atomic nuclei are normally drawn as a combination of protons and neutrons grouped together as close as possible. Given the enormous repulsive force between two protons such a configuration cannot represent reality. Quantum physics pretends to solve this problem by means of quarks, held together by gluons. This article presents a model without magic particles.
Category: Quantum Physics

[981] viXra:1803.0035 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-30 04:51:32

Why Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s Atomic Model is Invalid

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 5 Pages. Version 2 contains editorial changes in version 1

Outstanding surprisingly the misconception regarding the phenomenon potential energy most likely caused the change from Rutherford-Bohr’s to Heisenberg-Schrödinger’s atomic model.
Category: Quantum Physics

[980] viXra:1802.0314 [pdf] replaced on 2018-05-24 08:14:18

What Went Wrong with the Atomic Mass Unit

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 3 Pages. Version 2 and 3 show that the definition of the amu is wrong, not its application, as presented in version 1.

The atomic mass unit has already been applied for more than 200 years. The problem is that the amu now-a-days has been defined in two different ways: the Newtonian one and the one based on present physics by applying the magic energy mc2 and the magic atomic nuclear forces, interpreted as nuclear binding energy. This energy is posited as equal to mc2, without any motivation and as such violating the law of mass conservation.
Category: Quantum Physics

[979] viXra:1802.0314 [pdf] replaced on 2018-04-24 11:35:11

What Went Wrong with the Atomic Mass Unit

Authors: Sjaak Uitterdijk
Comments: 3 Pages. Version 2 shows that the definition of the amu is wrong. It turned out that its application is not the fundamental problem, as presented in version 1.

The atomic mass unit has already been applied for more than 200 years. The problem is that the amu now-a-days has been defined in two different ways: the Newtonian one and the one based on present physics by applying the magic energy mc2 and the magic atomic nuclear forces, interpreted as nuclear binding energy. This energy is posited as equal to mc2, without any motivation and as such violating the law of mass conservation.
Category: Quantum Physics